A subdivision on the edge of the wild

  • Jeff Nichols

 

The subdivision in Utah where I live is bang up against the mountains, with open land between us and the Snowbasin ski resort, and more national forest beyond. Our house lies at the end of a cul-de-sac on a tributary of the Weber River. A steep hill flanks us to the south, thick with Gambel oaks, and scrubby brush chokes the vacant lot upstream.

In the summer we feel closed off from the world.

When we have the sense to stop whatever we’re doing, we sit, look and listen.  Ducklings get separated from parents and raft the spring floods. Cutthroat trout leap up the broken concrete that constitutes the five-foot-falls under our bridge.

I’ve never seen a fish make the jump, and the pool below the falls is full of trout all summer long.  But every year there are fingerlings upstream, so some agile swimmers make it.  Minks, escapees most likely from the local fur farms, sometimes course up the banks.  On one hot day a 5-foot rattlesnake looped his tail around a cottonwood and drank from the creek.

Our location on the margins means that we attract transients. After Eastern blue jays made an appearance, our report to the Audubon Society yielded knots of shy birders hoping for a glimpse of this creature -- as common as an English sparrow in my New York hometown. The first blue jay came to a messy end. A sharp-shinned hawk, much like the one that crashed into our glass doors and knocked itself out, loitered near the bird feeder.  When we approached, the hawk flopped away to reveal its grasp of a blue victim. 

Moose are less bloody, if more destructive.  A half-grown bull once backed my sheepdog into his doghouse, flinging dinner-plate hooves around his head, then looked down at him as if to say, “Now, stay there.” No dummy, the dog did.

Cow and calf pairs of moose give our apple trees the only pruning they ever get; the cows can strip a branch like a kid scraping the last of a popsicle off a stick.  Our fruit yield has improved ever since.  Often the only evidence of moose presence is a deep footprint, some chewed twig-ends and a fresh, moose-turd pie.

These visits from the local cast of wild creatures are mostly welcome, but we’re less happy with others.  The birdfeeders nourished a colony of rats, despite our cats and the local strays.  We had high hopes for an ermine exterminator that spent an hour racing along the rats’ winter trails, but he was never seen again.  We finally broke the back of the rat insurgency with a battery-powered “zapper” trap.

The real trouble came as a surprise, but it shouldn’t have. Two years ago I noticed freshly cut cottonwood branches floating downstream and assumed that the neighbors had done some pruning.  My mother-in-law suggested beavers.  She’s a lovely woman, but notorious for her colorful imagination, so at first, I didn’t take her remark seriously. A closer look at the branches, however, showed unmistakable signs of chisel-like teeth, and that night the dog and I heard a loud slap of a tail.  

This posed a dilemma.  Our screen of trees was clearly threatened.  Just as clearly, beavers belonged here.  Their ponds provide excellent habitat for fish; the dams capture sediment and help create rich soil. And maybe they would target my neighbor’s tamarisk, planted at the suggestion of an irresponsible nurseryman.

There are also historical symmetries.  In 1825, rival British and American fur-trapping parties almost came to blows a mile from our house.  Peter Skene Ogden, the British Hudson’s Bay Company leader, had orders to create a “fur desert,” but he retreated and the Americans took over. Eventually, there were no beaver left to be trapped.

Now the beavers were back, and I was worried. Their infant dam was rising in a subdivision, and the resulting pond could flood my basement. I contemplated calling animal control while I wrapped chicken wire around our trees but guessed that the authorities would turn out with guns, traps or poison. In the end, I chose cowardice and decided to let nature take its course.

Then all beaver activity stopped; I assumed that one of the neighbors had taken action.  Then a week later fresh lengths of sapling floated in the pool, and that night the dog and I heard another decisive slap on the water -- the return of the native.  I can’t wait to see what happens next.

Jeff Nichols is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (hcn.org). He teaches history at Westminster College in Salt Lake City.

Note: the opinions expressed in this column are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect those of High Country News, its board or staff. If you'd like to share an opinion piece of your own, please write Betsy Marston at [email protected].

High Country News Classifieds
  • PROGRAM MANAGER, SUSTAINING FLOWS
    Friends of the Verde River, Cottonwood, AZ. Apply at https://verderiver.org/employment-opportunities/
  • PROGRAM ASSOCIATE - VERDE RIVER EXCHANGE
    Verde River Exchange - Friends of the Verde River, Cottonwood, AZ. Apply at https://verderiver.org/employment-opportunities/
  • CODE COMPLIANCE OFFICER
    Teton County Planning & Building is hiring! Our ideal candidate is a team-player, a problem-solver, pays attention to detail, and can clearly communicate technical material...
  • ARCHITECTURE DRAFTSPERSON/PROJECT MANAGER
    Studio Architects is seeking a full time Architectural drafts-person/project manager with1-3 years of experience to join our firm. At Studio Architects our mission is to...
  • ASSISTANT MANAGER/TRAINEE, COLORADO RANCH
    needed for 16,000+ acre conservation property in south central Colorado. Qualified candidate would have experience working on a ranch or wilderness property, general forestry/fire management...
  • FARM HAND &/OR NANNY IN ESCALANTE
    Nanny for 18-mnth-old. Yearly salary, vacation, health insurance. Spanish/other foreign-language native spkr prefrrd.
  • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
    Washington Association of Land Trusts seeks an ED to build on WALTs significant success & to lead the association to new levels of achievement. See...
  • BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM STRAWBALE HOME IN WESTERN COLORADO!
    Secluded, energy efficient Southwestern home on 40 wooded acres. Broker - Rand Porter - United Country Real Colorado Properties. 970-261-1248, $425K
  • PUBLIC LANDS ORGANIZER
    The Arizona Wildlife Federation (AWF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, inspiring, and assisting individuals and organizations to value, conserve, enhance, manage, and protect...
  • FORMER RETREAT CENTER/CONSERVATION PROPERTY FOR SALE
    57 acres in Skull Valley, AZ, 17 miles from Prescott, year-round creek, swimming holes, secluded canyon, hiking/meditation trails, oaks, pines, garden, greenhouse. House, office building,...
  • ARIZONA PUBLIC LANDS ORGANIZER
    Title: Public Lands Organizer About the Arizona Wildlife Federation (AWF) The AWF is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, inspiring, and assisting individuals and organizations...
  • HISTORIC RANCH HOME W/ 20 ACRES
    Historic 1893 Ranch Headquarters. 4 Bdrm, 3.5 Ba, 4000 ft2. Remodeled 2002. Includes 2 studio apts, stables, arena, workshop, 5 RV hookups. Chirachua & Peloncillo...
  • NORTH TUCSON FOOTHILLS
    11.63 acres of lush desert foothills on Tucson's near north side, secluded, secure, no HOA. 10 minute walk to Waldorf and Montessori schools, regional bike...
  • VICE PRESIDENT OF RETAIL OPERATIONS
    The Vice President of Retail Operations will provide overall leadership and accountability for purchasing, product development, merchandising planning, visual merchandising, retail operational excellence, oversight and...
  • ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
    Grand Staircase Escalante Partners seeks an experienced fundraiser with excellent communication and organizational skills.
  • MS ACCESS DATABASE PROGRAMER
    Looking for an access programmer. Contract position. Send resume with references and rates to: [email protected] www.prospace.biz
  • PROGRAM MANAGER
    position in Phoenix with the Babbitt Center for Land and Water Policy.
  • ROADS END CABIN NEAR YELLOWSTONE
    Vaulted ceilings, two fireplaces, two bedrooms, loft, jetted tub, wifi. Forest, mountain views. Wildlife. [email protected]
  • ACCOUNTING CLERK
    Our director is seeking to employ the services of an Accounting Clerk to assist with various accounting and administrative tasks. This is a great opportunity...
  • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COMMUNITY RADIO PROJECT
    Community Radio Project, Cortez, CO (KSJD & the Sunflower Theatre). Visit ksjd.org and click on the Executive Director search link. CRP is an EOE.