Sarah Gilman

Sarah has covered the West's natural resources, politics and people since 2006. She writes and draws from Portland, Oregon. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Hakai Magazine, BioGraphic, Adventure Journal Quarterly and others. She was a staff and contributing editor at High Country News for 11 years. She grew up in Boulder, Colorado and has spent most of her adult life in small towns in the Rockies, studying white-crowned sparrows, reporting for newspapers and magazines and working on a trail crew. Her favorite tool — from her days building steps and retaining walls on the slopes of Mount Massive outside Leadville — is the double jack. These days, she's also especially partial to her 8-lb. maul. 

Two weeks in the West
Western communities get their hands dirty, growing food and pushing for local production; growers deal with frosts and costs; bees still in trouble; action on Farm Bill but not on immigration; and California’s Tejon Ranch is more or less preserved.
Two weeks in the West
Development threatens inholdings in national parks and forests; a few wilderness bills move through Congress; oil and mining booms in the West; W.R. Grace sets up trust for its victims; Homeland Security dodges enviro laws for border barriers; coal power
Two weeks in the West
Despite a cold winter, the West is still warming; the Southern Nevada Water Authority has wild ideas about water; renewable energy is on a roll, but expensive Western resorts are not; neglected Forest Service roads make a mess in the Pacific Northwest.
Two weeks in the West
A good time to buy a McMansion – cheap; lawmakers wrangle over development; “eco-terrorism” in suburbia; EPA head honcho in trouble; cleaning up dirty Western air – and a few dirty Western politicians.
Remembering our wildness
In The Animal Dialogues, Colorado author Craig Childs writes of chance encounters with wild animals.
Two weeks in the West
Nasty chemicals in the Western air; drilling dust; EPA gets tougher on mercury; wildlife agency reconsiders habitat for Canada lynx and protection for sage grouse and white-tailed prairie dogs; and Grand Canyon gets a man-made flood.
Two weeks in the West
Wind and solar energy projects ramp up across the West; Conservation Reserve Program ramps down; the West’s volcanic history; potatoes are good for you.
Two weeks in the West
EPA stymies California’s attempt to cut tailpipe emissions; the West is growing but not sure where its next meal or drink of water will come from; increasing amounts of ammonium – and guns – in the parks; avalanche fatalities are up.
Mortal fear and a state of wild grace
In The Ice Cave: A Woman’s Adventures from the Mojave to the Antarctic, Lucy Jane Bledsoe chases her own wild fears across the landscape in search of a state of grace.
Good Samaritan bill could clean up old mines
A bill introduced by Colorado Rep. John Salazar could make it easier for environmental groups and others to clean up pollution at thousands of orphaned hardrock mines
Burning down the house
Despite the promises of the Healthy Forests Act, the Bush administration has proposed sweeping cuts to community fire programs in the West
Mass wolf kill rests on shaky science
Idaho’s Fish and Game Department wants to boost dwindling elk numbers by killing wolves in the Lolo management zone
City makes desperate bid for watershed
Grand Junction and Palisade, Colo., try unsuccessfully to bid on oil and gas leases to protect their water supply from contamination by drilling
Citizens unite against gas field chaos
In western Colorado, the Grand Valley Citizens Alliance is trying to work with industry to set protections for landowners before more drilling gets under way
U.S. Department of Energy elbows in on Clean Water Act
The federal Energy Department and the state of Wyoming have challenged Montana’s plan to establish pollution controls for coalbed methane wells
First fatal wolf attack recorded in North America?
A 22-year-old Canadian man, whose partially eaten body was found in the woods of northern Saskatchewan, may represent the first documented instance of a human being killed by healthy wolves in North America
Study questions value of post-fire logging
A group of scientists at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry publish a controversial study saying salvage logging may actually slow forest recovery
Dear friends
New interns Sarah Gilman and Brett Wilkison; remembering Robert E. "Bob" Wolf; HCN potluck in Tucson
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