Sarah Gilman

Sarah has covered the West's natural resources, politics and people since 2006. She writes and draws from Portland, Oregon. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Hakai Magazine, BioGraphic, Adventure Journal Quarterly and others. She was a staff and contributing editor at High Country News for 11 years. She grew up in Boulder, Colorado and has spent most of her adult life in small towns in the Rockies, studying white-crowned sparrows, reporting for newspapers and magazines and working on a trail crew. Her favorite tool — from her days building steps and retaining walls on the slopes of Mount Massive outside Leadville — is the double jack. These days, she's also especially partial to her 8-lb. maul. 

Street artist Jetsonorama tries a new kind of healing in Navajoland
Street artist Jetsonorama tries a new kind of healing in Navajoland
A black physician wheatpastes gigantic photographs outdoors to celebrate the tribe and human experience.
Colorado water diversions, urban and rural
Colorado water diversions, urban and rural
Colorado's Front Range and Western Slope communities and farms have always wrangled over the water produced high in the Rocky Mountains.
That old Bakken forth
Drillers again sniffing around Montana's not-actually-fully protected Rocky Mountain Front
Uncontrolled release
No matter how bad you want to control it, information finds a way
Growing grizzly population conflicts with USDA sheep research station
Growing grizzly population conflicts with USDA sheep research station
As Yellowstone's grizzlies spread into the Centennial Mountains, some fear conflicts will arise with the century-old federal Sheep Experiment Station, which summers its flocks in bear habitat on the Idaho-Montana border.
Beauty and the Beast
Beauty and the Beast
Photographers and artists -- and scientists, too -- discover that a terrible beauty can be found in ravaged industrial regions.
Sheep vs. bear, agency vs. agency
A century-old federal sheep research field station in the Northern Rockies may become a major problem for wildlife
Waking up from the holiday food coma
A few significant things happened in the West while you had your face buried in the green bean casserole. Oh wait, was that me?
Holiday break
Holiday break
High Country News skips an issue; visitors; HCN founder Tom Bell is honored; correction.
What Joe Arapaio’s legacy means
What Joe Arapaio’s legacy means
Arizona sheriff's shocking legacy should force meaningful change in U.S. immigration debate
The bright side of the Berkeley Pit
The bright side of the Berkeley Pit
Even the most poisoned places hold redemptive power
Aspiring farmers find creative ways to succeed
Aspiring farmers find creative ways to succeed
Sarahlee Lawrence and Amy Ridout are part of a wave of young farmers determined to remake the American food system.
Trampled by tourists
Arizona's loved-to-death Fossil Creek experienced a record-breaking summer season
Feds attempt to speed complicated process of building power lines
Feds attempt to speed complicated process of building power lines
The Obama administration's electrical transmission permitting agencies are cooperating to speed grid updates and fast track clean energy projects, as demand for power grows.
Energy succeeds where housing developers can't
Energy succeeds where housing developers can't
As the West's housing boom fades, natural resource extraction surges, and a defunct housing development on the east side of Colorado Springs, Colo., may soon face drilling by Ultra Petroleum.
Mapping the West ... in air polluters
A joint investigation by NPR and the Center for Public Integrity reveals some interesting things about the region
'Wilderness Lite' wins the day
Federal court reinstates Clinton Roadless Rule (for now, at least)
A lovely and restless autumn
A lovely and restless autumn
Art Director Cindy Wehling takes a break, and Kris Scott and Shaun Gibson take over the reins; visitors; corrections and clarifications.
Feds crack down on "new California gold rush"
Will pot crackdowns lead to war between Western communities and the Department of Justice?
The long and winding road...
...toward the removal of four dams on the Klamath River
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