Sarah Gilman

Sarah has covered the West's natural resources, politics and people since 2006. She writes and draws from Portland, Oregon. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Hakai Magazine, BioGraphic, Adventure Journal Quarterly and others. She was a staff and contributing editor at High Country News for 11 years. She grew up in Boulder, Colorado and has spent most of her adult life in small towns in the Rockies, studying white-crowned sparrows, reporting for newspapers and magazines and working on a trail crew. Her favorite tool — from her days building steps and retaining walls on the slopes of Mount Massive outside Leadville — is the double jack. These days, she's also especially partial to her 8-lb. maul. 

The bastard child of the range
The bastard child of the range
Wild horses are a touchy subjects for many Americans; the BLM's complex policies on mustang round-up and maintenance illustrates the point.
Citizen oversight fizzles in Wyoming gas patch
Beleaguered Pinedale Anticline Working Group votes to disband
The fossil record: How my family found a home in the West
The fossil record: How my family found a home in the West
The Gilman clan didn't go on normal vacations; their fossil-addicted parents trundled them across the West looking for the shells of long-extinct sea creatures.
Another win in the Wyoming Range
Conservationists announce buyout of 58,000 acres of oil and gas leases to protect wildlife habitat
You get what you pay for
Federal energy subsidies make a big difference in which industries win and lose
How do you tell an invasive species from a natural colonizer?
In this age of pervasive human influence, it seems awfully difficult
Everything you thought you knew about camping is wrong
Everything you thought you knew about camping is wrong
Okay, maybe just some things
Mourning the world we've lost
Mourning the world we've lost
Art as elegy and as a call to action on behalf of the natural world.
From art as elegy to art as action
How do we grieve for nature that is no more?
Omni-busted
What the latest package of public lands bills says about the politics of conservation
Helping hikers before they get hurt
Helping hikers before they get hurt
National parks are increasingly focusing on educating hikers before they get hurt or lost, a technique known as preventative search and rescue.
Search and … inform
Preventative search and rescue may help national parks save money and lives
What's the best place for Big Solar?
What's the best place for Big Solar?
Environmentalists have been too busy squabbling over proposed solar plants to pay much attention to one of the most promising sites: Gila Bend, Ariz.
It’s the pits
New Mexico’s conservative pols rage against one of the nation's strictest oil and gas rules
HCNers go to journalism conferences
HCN online editor Stephanie Paige Ogburn and managing editor Jodi Peterson attend digital media workshops; Danielle Venton gets public radio job; Denver Nicks writes a book; visitors; correction.
Frack fricasee
Election-year politics (partially) hijack Interior's new rules for hydraulic fracturing
Visitors, books and brand-new babies
Visitors, books and brand-new babies
Spring brings visitors, some with new books; Katie Lee publishes an epic poem at the age of 92; writer Eric Wagner welcomes a daughter; corrections.
Last in line
Massive bird die-off stirs fight over Klamath water deal
When a boom is not a boon
When a boom is not a boon
In North Dakota, the Three Affiliated Tribes are trying to cope with both the benefits and the unexpected problems brought by the Bakken oil rush.
The unbearable lightness of winter
2012 has been a record-breakingly hot and dry year
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