Cally Carswell

Contributing Editor

Cally got her start in public radio before taking the print plunge with HCN in 2009. New Mexico-born, Chicago-raised, Cally spent her pre-HCN decades plotting her return to the Southwest. Happy to once again be a tiny dot in a big landscape, she writes and edits news and features for the magazine and freelances for other publications from her home in Santa Fe. Cally's work on forest mortality and climate change won a 2014 Science in Society Award from the National Association of Science Writers and a Kevin Carmody award for in-depth reporting from the Society of Environmental Journalists.

email: callyc at hcn.org

Drought damages trees' ability to store carbon
Drought damages trees' ability to store carbon
How long-term forest health is compromised years after dry-spells.
Deaths renew calls for national parks to rescind BASE jumping bans
Deaths renew calls for national parks to rescind BASE jumping bans
Squirrel suited flyers say the bans actually contribute to deadly accidents.
Spring board meeting, and swearing
Spring board meeting, and swearing
A recap of the recent board meeting in Paonia, an update on our profanity policy and a correction.
See you in July
See you in July
A skipped issue, a former editor publishes a book and visitors galore
Grand Canyon floods are rebuilding sandbars
Grand Canyon floods are rebuilding sandbars
But there are limits to what can be done to tweak dam management to benefit ecosystems.
Canada can't expand oil sands and also meet global climate goals
Canada can't expand oil sands and also meet global climate goals
103 scientists call for a moratorium on new development.
Genetic research lays foundation for bold conservation strategies
Genetic research lays foundation for bold conservation strategies
To save the greatest number of species, should we focus on the most common?
Rains bring incomplete drought relief to parts of Southwest
Rains bring incomplete drought relief to parts of Southwest
Snowpack is above normal in spots, but doesn't make up for its lack earlier in the year.
L.A.’s wild side
Wins for workers
Wins for workers
Western cities lead the national movement for a higher minimum wage.