Writers on the Range


Writers on the Range is opinion from the ground up.


Let Nature fill the niche
Wolves are making their way back into Yellowstone.
Can some good come out of the CAP?
The writer reflects on the costs and benefits of the Central Arizona Project.
We're in this fight together
Some grass-roots workers and Washington-based politicians are partners for the environment.
Is the Northwest ready to live within its forests?
A reporter chronicles the events in the Pacific Northwest leading up to the Forest Summit in Oregon.
How we pros covered the summit
Ed Marston reflects on his experience at the Forest Summit in Oregon.
A man and his dog, in search of grace and innocence
Book excerpt: "A Hunter's Road, a Journey with Man and Dog across the American Uplands", by Jim Fergus.
The West, according to The New York Times
Bruce Babbitt, secretary of the Interior Department, represents the face of the emerging West.
Rhymes from the range attract 8,000
Cowboy poets gather in Elko, Nevada.
Don't look for free inquiry at the West's land-grant colleges
Essay on the role of western academics in policy decisions.
Searching for the city on the peaks of Wyoming
A book excerpt from C.L. Rawlin's 'Sky's Witness' describes life as a forest tech.
The only hope for wilderness is to save all the parts
Mike Bader, executive director of the Alliance for the Wild Rockies, advocates preserving the Northern Rockies in its entirety as an ecosytem.
Armed ecosystem managers build roads through wildlands
An essay on Earth First! activity in the Nez Perce National Forest.
Wilderness politics are anything but simple
The President of the Montana Wilderness Association's governing council offers an opinion on the Montana Wilderness bill.
Forest Service is trying to turn over a new leaf, but critics have doubts
The U.S. Forest Service believes there is a clear patch of land in Montana that affords a clear view of the future's enlightened forestry. The problem is, the agency's own past sometimes sullies the view.
A remembrance of William Penn Mott
When I heard that former National Park Service Director William Penn Molt died last month, my first thought was, "At least he lived long enough to see a wolf in Yellowstone."
Indian land claims deserve our support
The presence of the 24,000-acre Pueblo of Sandia prevents the city of Albuquerque from sprawling into the nearby foothills to the south. Nevertheless, the environmental community in northern new Mexico is fighting the tribe's attempt to reclaim its land from the U.S. Forest Service.
Yellowstone forces to shoot rogue tourists after relocation fails
National Park Service officials today confirmed reports of the shooting of two tourists in Yellowstone Park early this season. The shootings were authorized under a newly implemented policy to protect bears.
Everyone feels free to tell the farmer how to farm
For every farmer there is the big question: How to farm? Every square foot of earth is different. No farmer's experience will be exactly like any other.
How clean coal helped kill a utility
Rebuilding the Colorado-Ute Electric Association power plant at Nucla, Colo., was a technical success. Unfortunately, although the operation went well, the patient died a lingering and painful death.
Rural economies can reform or go the way of Detroit
Environmentalism is the vanguard of urban America, which is giving the rural West the choice of adapting to the larger society's vision or of dying.
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