Utah

Mistaken identity; bizarre trees; chocolate grizlars
Mistaken identity; bizarre trees; chocolate grizlars
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
Hunters and anglers flex their political muscles
Hunters and anglers flex their political muscles
In the midterms, public land access issues helped several candidates nab governorships.
The shutdown has halted important scientific research
The shutdown has halted important scientific research
Disrupted funding for federal science hurts Western lands and economies.
Two weeks in the West
Cross-country skiers and snowmobilers clash over access to Logan Canyon, Utah; Mount Jefferson, Mont.; and (of course) Yellowstone; Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth steps down to be replaced by Gail Kimbell; West becomes player in national politics; bor
Heard around the West
Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?; remembering (not always kindly) Helen Chenoweth-Hage; guilt-trips and voting; extreme fried food
Is the great federal land debate over?
Two trends are almost as dangerous as the idea of directly selling off the public lands: land transfers done in the name of economic development, and the outsourcing of jobs in the federal land-management agencies.
Saints speak out against nuclear waste
The Mormon Church has issued a statement opposing a planned nuclear waste storage site not far from Salt Lake City, Utah, on the Skull Valley Goshute Reservation
'Clinging hopelessly to the past'
In his determination to cling, however hopelessly, to Utah’s past, Canyon Country Zephyr founder Jim Stiles has taken on miners, ranchers, developers, mountain bikers and – most recently – some of his fellow environmentalists
Enviros wary of 'Nevada-style' wilderness bill
A controversial proposed wilderness bill for Utah’s Washington County includes utility corridors, motorized-vehicle trails, and public-land sales designed to accommodate urban growth
Pipeline and dam dreams
The Utah Legislature has approved money for "preconstruction" work on a new dam for the Wasatch Front and a new pipeline for the booming city of St. George
Tapping into energy's fringe
As energy companies go after "unconventional" natural gas – such as tight-sands gas and coalbed methane –the environmental impacts are becoming increasingly apparent
Congress bets on oil shale
Northeastern Utah, southern Wyoming and western Colorado are humming with new talk of oil shale, but industry insiders say that the technology has years to go before oil shale development is financially and environmentally viable
Western military bases still reporting for duty
Cannon Air Force Base in New Mexico and Ellsworth Air Force Base in South Dakota narrowly escape being shut down by the federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission
His playground pulls fun hogs off the public lands
Jeremy Parriott is working with friends to create a 320-acre extreme-sports playground near Moab, Utah, to give four-wheelers and others a place to play off the public lands
Moab: On the horns of a recreation dilemma
Some of the residents of the Moab, Utah, area are losing patience with out-of-control off-highway recreation, and looking to the BLM to bring things under control
Beehive state may get new wilderness — and more
In Utah, an "omnibus" public-lands bill may create several new wilderness areas near Zion National Park, but at the same time authorize the auction of federal lands for development
Colorado River kisses a toxic mess good-bye
The Department of Energy finally agrees to move the Atlas uranium mine tailings pile away from Moab, Utah, and the flood risk of the Colorado River.
The life of an unsung Western water diplomat
Silver Fox of the Rockies by Daniel Tyler tells the story of Delphus E. Carpenter, who sought peaceful resolutions to Western water problems, and helped create the 1922 Colorado River Compact
Follow-up
Owyhee Canyonlands wilderness comes closer to Idaho; Bush funds CALFED; oil and gas brings money to Rocky Mountain states; National Wildlife Federation says federal Conservation Reserve Program is abused
Heard around the West
Bowdlerizing books at the Layton library; Oregon cheese not from Oregon; property rights – and wrongs – in Delta, Colo.; bears and beer; Colorado coffee-creamer cubs; loving guns in Montana; and prairie dogs vs. gas development
Ancient archaeological secret is revealed
Archaeologists are thrilled about the state of Utah’s acquisition of Waldo Wilcox’s Range Creek Canyon ranch, site of a thousand-year-old Frement Indian settlement
Follow-up
More than 33,000 fish died in Klamath River in 2002; Bill Barrett Corp. gets go-ahead for seismic testing near Utah’s Nine Mile Canyon; Building 771 at Rocky Flats demolished; Kennewick Man will not be reburied
Heard around the West
Forest Service fire liaison busted for tossing cigarette butts; Interior decorator Gale Norton; horse slasher; cell phones vs. snakes; neighborhood with the slurry on top; tough on crime at Yellowstone; and Bonner County, Idaho, is quiet
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