Scientific Research

What’s special about a good-for-nothing sunflower?
What’s special about a good-for-nothing sunflower?
In an age of extinction, a sunny, endangered flower serves as a beacon of arid lands.
What does wilderness sound like?
What does wilderness sound like?
A photographer and audio researchers document the soundscapes of remote national parks in Alaska.
Tossing salmon for science
Tossing salmon for science
A decades-long experiment demonstrates how the iconic fish help trees grow.
Learning to live with bears
Learning to live with bears
Two books examine our evolving relationship with bears.
Climate change is unraveling natural cycles in the West
Climate change is unraveling natural cycles in the West
Spring’s early arrival creates more mismatches in ecosystems.
What citizen science can say about seabird deaths
What citizen science can say about seabird deaths
In the Pacific Northwest, the diligence of citizen scientists helps discern patterns in die-offs.
Ten years, 3 million pounds of soil and 1,800 sensors
Ten years, 3 million pounds of soil and 1,800 sensors
The numbers behind the world’s largest weathering experiment.
An end to Tucson’s growth wars
An end to Tucson’s growth wars
A conservation plan puts science ahead of politics.
West Obsessed: The March for Science, out West
West Obsessed: The March for Science, out West
After Earth Day, a look at researchers’ economic influence and political sway.
Republicans set their sights on the EPA’s science
Republicans set their sights on the EPA’s science
The federal agency that regulates our environment may soon have less data to work with.
California’s backcountry drug war
California’s backcountry drug war
Dangerous drug cartels are growing pot on public lands—putting wildlife, water supplies, and outdoor enthusiasts at grave risk.
California wants to give dispirited federal workers a job
California wants to give dispirited federal workers a job
Why the state’s utility commission is recruiting EPA, Energy employees.
Invade, steal water: The plant spreading in Utah’s wetlands
Invade, steal water: The plant spreading in Utah’s wetlands
Battling a nonnative reed to protect Great Salt Lake bird habitat.
The biocrust conundrum
The biocrust conundrum
By destroying biocrust communities, climate change may be making arid lands more reflective — which could slow down warming.
Planes, pits & snowmobiles: how scientists get good data
Planes, pits & snowmobiles: how scientists get good data
A day in the field as researchers wring water data from Colorado’s snowpack.
People cause the majority of wildfires
People cause the majority of wildfires
New research finds illegal campfires, cigarette butts and other accidental ignitions have nearly tripled the wildfire season.
Climate scientists fear harassment, threats
Climate scientists fear harassment, threats
Researchers fear attacks from a range of powerful foes in the coming years – and for many, it has long been happening.
Have we underestimated the West’s super-floods?
Have we underestimated the West’s super-floods?
Scientists warn that enormous floods may be more likely than we thought — and the Oroville Dam and others weren’t built to withstand them.
Western cities try to cut light pollution
Western cities try to cut light pollution
Hitting the dimmer switch on city light helps animals and skygazers, too.
Artful science
Artful science
Data and poetry converge in an experimental forest.
The watcher and the watched
The watcher and the watched
Observation transforms our bodies and minds.
Ask a Scientist: Why NOAA matters for the West
Ask a Scientist: Why NOAA matters for the West
CIRES head Waleed Abdalati answers our questions.
How one artist captured the changing climate in watercolor
How one artist captured the changing climate in watercolor
Artist and scientist Jill Pelto’s riveting paintings use data to show climate change’s impacts.
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