Public Lands

How Ryan Bundy sees the West
How Ryan Bundy sees the West
The Bunkerville standoff case portends a trial over federal authority in the region.
Deer at recess; Stranded in Kanab; A brain-eating mantis
Deer at recess; Stranded in Kanab; A brain-eating mantis
Mishaps and mayhem around the region.
What are we fighting for?
What are we fighting for?
Bell Prize Winner: Through the trials of life, a young writer finds she’s fighting for our spirit.
Coal-export schemes ignite unusual opposition, from Wyoming to India
Coal-export schemes ignite unusual opposition, from Wyoming to India
Ambitious schemes to build railroads and ports to ship Powder River Basin coal abroad will bring pollution and traffic to communities along the transport path, who are rising up in protest.
Western legislatures grab for control of public lands
Western legislatures grab for control of public lands
Some Western states are rekindling the Sagebrush Rebellion and demanding ownership of federal lands -- but it's not just about local control.
Selling what's priceless is the nuttiest idea of all
Selling what's priceless is the nuttiest idea of all
Some Western legislators want to sell off our public lands -- an idea that is not only impractical, but contrary to the desires of most Westerners.
How to survive the lean times
How to survive the lean times
Her brush with homelessness gives Jane Goetze the background to offer some wry advice.
A chance to do it right in the West
A chance to do it right in the West
Hoping for a Western Interior secretary who practices the politics of collaboration.
Wilderness, schmilderness
In Nevada, local counties spooked about the prospect of wilderness within their boundaries derail public-lands bills that could actually help their communities.
Rebels with a Lost Cause
The fiercely conservative lawyers of the Sagebrush Rebellion continue to fight against environmental regulations, but despite all their sound and fury, very little has changed on the public lands.
Fees have become a public-lands shakedown
Ted Williams says charging fees to use public lands is worse than extortion.
Driven to fight
Retired BLM agent Lynell Schalk goes head-to-head with her former bosses over protecting southern Utah’s priceless archaeological sites from off-road vehicle traffic.
Energy illusions
A BLM report issued in late 2006 appears to show that less land is available for energy exploration now than in 2003, but a closer look shows that appearances are deceiving.
Is the great federal land debate over?
Two trends are almost as dangerous as the idea of directly selling off the public lands: land transfers done in the name of economic development, and the outsourcing of jobs in the federal land-management agencies.
The vast, unpatrolled public lands
The same solitude that attracts nature-lovers to the West’s public lands attracts lawbreakers as well – particularly a growing number of Mexican marijuana-growers
Change comes slowly to Escalante country
Change comes slowly to Escalante country
Just as it seemed the local communities were starting to accept the BLM’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, the rise of conservative national politics has helped to revive old grudges and stir up opposition
Grazing foes float a buyout
Anti-grazing groups are trying to convince Congress to buy out ranchers' grazing allotments on public land, but resistance on the part of permit holders may stop the effort.
Showdown on the Nevada range
The Sagebrush Rebellion smolders when the BLM impounds and tries to auction off cattle owned by ranchers Ben Colvin and Jack Vogt for refusing to pay for grazing allotments.
Monuments caught in the crosshairs
Under the new administration of George W. Bush, Republicans seek to open Clinton's new national monuments to oil and gas exploration and other uses and to revise the way monuments are created.
Beauty and the Beast
As the small, conservative towns bordering Utah's new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument begin to adapt to the monument they never wanted, a new vision for what gateway communities and preserved areas might be begins to slowly emerge.
1996: Clinton takes a 1.7 million-acre stand in Utah
1996: Clinton takes a 1.7 million-acre stand in Utah
President Bill Clinton uses the Antiquities Act of 1906 to designate a new 1.7 million-acre national monument in southern Utah, and reactions range from joy to indignation and outrage.
Ranchers arrested at wildlife refuge
Ranchers arrested at wildlife refuge
The arrest of rancher Dwight Hammond for running cattle on a wildlife refuge provokes a wise-use backlash in Oregon.
The Not O.K. Corral
Rancher Cliven Bundy refuses to pay grazing fees to BLM.