Oregon

West Coast fishermen have few options against sea lions
West Coast fishermen have few options against sea lions
The federal government continues to use explosives despite their ineffectiveness.
‘Cyanide bombs’ use reauthorized to kill wild animals
‘Cyanide bombs’ use reauthorized to kill wild animals
The traps have caused unintentional deaths, but Wildlife Services can continue to employ them to protect livestock and farm crops.
Portland club discrimination case settled
Portland club discrimination case settled
As part of the settlement, the dress code used to discriminate against black patrons must be stopped.
Tracking Ice Age people in Oregon
Tracking Ice Age people in Oregon
Craig Childs goes time-traveling in the buttes and basins of south-central Oregon, and ponders signs of early human occupation.
County kickbacks
County kickbacks
Western rural county governments often rely heavily on federal funding.
Wolves: The debate is seldom rational
Wolves: The debate is seldom rational
The great Western wolf debate is as emotional as ever.
Cultural blight
Cultural blight
The traditional lifestyles of several Northern California tribes are threatened by a pathogen that is killing off oak trees.
The only thing we have to fear …
The only thing we have to fear …
Refusing to despair despite the impacts of the economic downturn on a small Oregon town.
Cheewa James: Chronicler of the ‘Tribe That Wouldn’t Die’
Cheewa James digs into the little-known history of her own people: the Modoc Indians of southern Oregon’s Klamath Valley.
Heard Around the West
Counseling councilmen; a very virtual “virtual” fence; Arizona vs. college students; trapped in a CT scan; trophy land; smelling like a dog; paying taxes with skis.
Heard Around the West
Library book sale gets ugly in Eugene; Satan is the problem in Utah; advice on daffodils; nude man creates brief havoc in McMinnville, Ore.; car theft thrives in the West; Snowmass Mountain’s “smoke shacks” have to go
Why the West should copy Swiss transit
The contrast between a Mount Hood traffic jam and a week in a car-free Swiss resort convinces Bill Cook that the West needs to get serious about mass transit.
Why do we keep driving ourselves crazy?
The contrast between a Mount Hood traffic jam and a week in a car-free Swiss resort convinces Bill Cook that the West needs to get serious about mass transit.
The decline of logging is now killing
Now that logging no longer provides enough money to support Oregon’s libraries, Pepper Trail says it’s up to citizens to decide to keep their state’s bookshelves filled and accessible.
A quest for the world’s finest pinot noir
Brian Doyle’s new book, The Grail, lives up to its lively subtitle as it describes “a year ambling and shambling through an Oregon vineyard in pursuit of the best pinot noir in the whole wild world.”
A family of criminals and killers
In All God’s Children: Inside the Dark and Violent World of Street Families, Rene Denfeld tells the disturbing story of Portland’s teen runaways, charting the path that took one of them, Danielle Marie Cox, from honor student to convicted murderer.
Under the radar
Homeless families aren’t found only in urban areas. They’re also struggling to survive in the rural West, as shown by the story of Barbara Trivitt and her two children, who lived in a Jeep in Coos Bay, Oregon, this fall.
A River Once More
In Oregon, a revolutionary community alliance is working to put water – and steelhead trout – back into the Deschutes River
Film: Lens of compassion
Peter Richardson created an independent film called Clear Cut: The Story of Philomath, Oregon, to illuminate a culture clash that was tearing his hometown apart
Loss and renewal in the Northwest
Steven Radosevich writes simple, painful, personal essays about the changing landscape of the Pacific Northwest in his new book, Good Wood: Growth, Loss and Renewal.
The wild, wild weather
Whatever the cause, the weather in the West this last year has been wild and wacky
Empty pods and pleasant graveyards
In today’s surrealistic world, where language exists only to sell things, barren desert suburbs have names like "Lake Forest" and "WillowDale," while a graveyard is called "Pleasant Valley Cemetery."
'Ghost fleet' in search of a final resting place
Newport, Ore., decides the environmental and financial risks are too great to allow Bay Bridge Enterprises, a ship-recycling firm, to dismantle decommissioned military vessels at Yaquina Bay
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