Editor's Note

Where people are stepping up
Where people are stepping up
In the face of conflict and misinformation, hope remains.
The West protests
The West protests
‘Dominator culture’ and the injustices of climate change, COVID-19 and racism.
Don’t despair. Dissent.
Don’t despair. Dissent.
Look to others doing good work and act.
Schooling, fish
Judge Jim Redden is right to push the Bush administration on salmon restoration, but fish may end up faring as poorly in courtrooms as San Francisco’s schoolchildren did after well-intentioned decisions on busing.
Slipping into the holidays
This issue’s cover essay on New Mexico’s gas fields – and our publisher’s adventures during a recent snowstorm in Paonia – reveal the complex links that bind Westerners together for better or worse
Whistling in the park
Whistleblowing is not as romantic as Woodward’s "Deep Throat" makes it sound, but the retired public servants who make up the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees are doing valuable work, blowing the whistle for the sake of the national parks
Doing something about 'anything'
In this issue, Ray Ring offers a top 10 list on the midterm elections and reminds Westerners that the newly empowered Democrats in Congress are still not the sole arbiters of environmental policy
The West is not a zoo
The Peregrine Fund has proven that it can breed and release endangered birds of prey as often as it needs to, but do we want to treat Western wildlife like a crop of annual flowers that has to be re-seeded every year?
Life in the transition zone
Longtime community activist and HCN board member Luis Torres is delighted to see environmentalists and loggers working together in the forests of his native northern New Mexico
Good work in Washington
The Bush administration deserves credit for its "Water 2025" initiative, which provided grants that have helped the Deschutes River Conservancy and the Central Oregon Irrigation District begin restoring Oregon’s Deschutes River
Homegrown news: Money can't buy it
In an introduction to this special issue celebrating independent media, High Country News associate editor Jonathan Thompson recalls the exciting, exhausting, high-caffeine years he spent publishing his own newspaper in a small mountain town
Leave the wheels out of wilderness
As enjoyable as mountain biking is, bikes simply don’t belong in the wilderness, partly because the faster you travel through a place, the smaller – and tamer – that place begins to seem.
HCN's secret past
High Country News reveals its odd historical connection with the West’s uranium obsession of the 1950s
A green obsession
Westerners, like most Americans, are deeply in love with their lawns – but in an time of increasing drought, the Kentucky bluegrass is going to have to go
Playing God in suburbia
Is it really true that the U.S. has no choice but to employ a harsh form of triage in deciding which endangered species should live, and which must die?
November Surprise
Ray Ring’s cover story on the libertarian stealth campaign to put "takings" initiatives on Western ballots is the biggest untold political story of the year
HCN looks to the future
In a special summer reading issue, HCN dishes up a science fiction story that imagines life in the Southwest in 2030 or so, when "Big Daddy Drought" is in full stride, and California claims all water
Adapt or collapse
In his book Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, Jared Diamond warns about societies that overreach themselves – a warning that southern Arizona, in the midst of its tremendous real estate boom, ought to heed
Nostalgia is a moving target
Curmudgeons like Jim Stiles – owner/editor of Moab’s Canyon Country Zephyr – have a lot to teach us about why it is so important for us to cling to the West that we love
California, here we come
California has a lot to teach the Interior West – particularly about clean energy and water conservation
Tierra o Muerte
As the outside world bullies its way into northern New Mexico, the native Hispano culture has begun to fray, and today the region has the highest rate of heroin addiction in the country
The next boomtown
The discovery of heretofore "undiscovered" small towns, and their invasion by wealthy second-homeowners, brings money, problems and often disillusionment to much of the West
Hot times — hot damn
Michelle Nijhuis has just won the 2006 Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism for her series on global warming in the West, which concludes with this issue’s feature story
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