Editor's Note

The case for speculative journalism
The case for speculative journalism
Climate fiction can help us imagine the impacts of climate change in a way that science journalism can’t.
Where the incarceration and wildfire crises meet
Where the incarceration and wildfire crises meet
Prison firefighters are severely underpaid. And they’re the lucky ones.
The subversive nature of Indigenous art
The subversive nature of Indigenous art
These are the stories other non-Native outlets don’t dare to touch.
Relying on Navajo guides
Relying on Navajo guides
In this issue's feature story, reporter Marilyn Berlin Snell turns to Navajo guides to understand the challenges facing today's tribal government.
Economies of vice
Economies of vice
If marijuana becomes fully legal and taxable, it won't be the first time authorities have learned that it's easier - and more profitable - to manage vice than to try to eliminate it.
The return of the Lords of Yesterday
The return of the Lords of Yesterday
The West's once-faltering extractive economy is roaring back to life, powered by the energy needs of developing countries like China.
A lonely crusade
A lonely crusade
A Wyoming farmer's long struggle to find out what's polluting his water gets the attention of the EPA - and inspires reporter Abrahm Lustgarten of ProPublica.
The Las Vegas effect
The Las Vegas effect
Grand Canyon air tours are fun, the way Las Vegas is fun, but one of the world’s natural wonders should not be treated like a sideshow.
The cost of righteousness
The cost of righteousness
Has some environmentalists' refusal to compromise helped cause the delisting of wolves in Montana and Idaho?
Diabetes isn't destiny
Diabetes isn't destiny
Native Americans can win the long fight against poor health, malnutrition and disease.
Go East, young greens
Go East, young greens
What is it like to be an idealistic young environmentalist working on Capitol Hill?
Ruthless economics
Ruthless economics
By insisting on buying goods, especially food, as cheaply as possible, we ignore the hidden and occasionally horrendous costs.
The power of the lowly dirt particle
The power of the lowly dirt particle
The reservoirs of the West are a far cry from Eastern lakes, especially when it comes to the silt they carry.
Alaska ho!
Alaska ho!
High Country News ventures into the rocky terrain of Alaska's wildlife politics.
Presidential style
Presidential style
Obama's nonconfrontational approach to life underlies his slow-but-steady approach to Western environmental issues.
A dark moment, a glimmer of light
A dark moment, a glimmer of light
Despite the recent tragedy in Tucson, a sense of community blooms in the West, often in unlikely soil.
Diving deeper into the Bay Delta
Diving deeper into the Bay Delta
High Country News reporter Matt Jenkins gets his boots muddy writing about California's crazy water politics in the Bay Delta.
What lies beneath
What lies beneath
When pesticide chemicals were found underneath the houses of Barber Orchard, N.C., it aroused fears nationwide about the risks of building on former agricultural land.
Mining Reform: Deja vu again and again
Mining Reform: Deja vu again and again
A 138-year-old law blocks serious hardrock mining reform, despite the untiring work of activists.
How outsiders shape the West
How outsiders shape the West
Oklahoma isn't part of the West, but its two Republican senators have an enormous influence on the region.
Microclimates, macro problem
Microclimates, macro problem
As humans rely on our ingenuity to cope with climate change, wild plants and animals take refuge in the mountains’ microclimates.
Stringing up the Western sheriff
Stringing up the Western sheriff
The West has known extremist politics before, but we usually seem to end up tacking pretty close to the center.
Who can capture the Forest Service?
Who can capture the Forest Service?
The national forests are in such terrible shape that it's worth trying a few experiments in collaborative restoration work.
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