Climate Change

An unfrozen North
An unfrozen North
The world’s permafrost holds vast stores of carbon. What happens when it thaws?
A look into a climate-altered Alaska
A look into a climate-altered Alaska
Experiments in the permafrost zone near Denali simulate a warmer North.
Trespassing aliens; Garbage privacy; Brand your calves
Trespassing aliens; Garbage privacy; Brand your calves
Mishaps and mayhem from around the region.
Hot town, summer in the city
Living with drought in cities such as Denver, Colo., has its challenges.
The Great Western Apocalypse
Record-breaking heat and drought are frying the West, and scientist John Harte of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in Gothic, Colo., warns that this summer is only the kick-off for what global warming is likely to bring.
Is this wilderness perverted?
Utah Rep. Jim Hansen proposes half a million acres of wilderness in western Utah, but in the same amendment would dump hazardous waste in the nearby Skull Valley Goshute Reservation.
In the West, drought is a native
The West is naturally dry, according to the writer, and people should accept that fact, especially when there is a drought.
Fateful harvest a scary read
Duff Wilson's book, "Fateful Harvest: The True Story of a Small Town, a Global Industry, and a Toxic Secret," investigates a local agricultural chemicals provider who attempted to pass toxic waste off as recycled fertilizer.
Wilted West staggers into summer
The fourth year of a crippling drought throughout the West is potential for trouble, not only for farmers, but wildlife and the human population, as well.
Saving tired tires
A family-owned business, Cordova and Sons, in Cuba City, N.M., collects and recycles used tires for landscaping and building projects.
What is poisoning border babies?
Terrible birth defects among newborns in the Lower Rio Grande Valley may be caused by agricultural and industrial pollution, but no one knows for sure.
Trash talk
A new edition of "Rubbish! The Archaeology of Garbage" by William Rathje and Cullen Murphy, reports the fascinating findings of the University of Arizona's "Garbage Project."
Pollution pickle sours landowner
Cleaning up asbestos-laden soil around a warehouse owned by the Minot, N.D., Park District may cost the district a lot, with the previous owner long gone and the source of the asbestos, W.R. Grace, now bankrupt.
Will salt sink an agricultural empire?
Mike Delamore of the Bureau of Reclamation is trying to solve what seems an impossible problem: draining the salt building up on California's farmland while protecting water quality in the San Francisco Bay Delta.
All's fair in smog and waste?
A new Web site created by the Oakland, Calif., nonprofit Environmental Defense gathers information about environmental and health dangers in any community in the U.S.
The smog is lifting
After decades of cleanup efforts, Denver, Colo., is about to receive clean-air status from the Environmental Protection Agency.
Texaco spill leaves residents fuming
Some citizens of Sunburst, Mont., feel that Texaco has not done enough to clean up an underground gasoline pool left from a toxic spill 46 years ago.
New dump may trash Tacoma's water
Local critics worry that a new landfill may pollute drinking water used by Eatonville and Tacoma, Wash.
Drought drains the West
A look at the weather throughout the West shows lower-than-usual snowpacks and a lot of drought, making life hard for farmers and fish, and leading to fears of another fierce wildfire season.
Company leaves victims in its dust
In Libby, Mont., residents who are sick or dying of exposure to asbestos from W.R. Grace's vermiculite mine are outraged by the company's decision to file for bankruptcy in the face of their lawsuits.
I am an Inuit warrior
It's not easy being a person who lives in a high mountain ski town but hates snow and winter weather.
Will Western skies be clear enough?
The Western Regional Air Partnership has a plan to clear the air over the Colorado Plateau, but critics say the plan is much too soft and likely to prove ineffective.
Cement glues citizens together
Pueblo, Colo., citizens, who worked for years to restore air and water polluted by their city's one-time steel mills, now fear a planned cement manufacturing plant will make their newly livable community unlivable and polluted once again.