Birds

Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering?
Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering?
The enigmatic bird’s populations have not increased despite conservation efforts.
Latest: Long-term noise pollution gives birds PTSD
Latest: Long-term noise pollution gives birds PTSD
New research links natural gas compressors with physical impacts on birds.
Interior cancels decades-old protections for migratory birds
Interior cancels decades-old protections for migratory birds
The rollback prompts broad opposition from former officials from both political parties.
Calling all birders
The National Audubon Society’s 2004 State of the Birds report assesses worrisome population changes for 450 non-game birds
Truce holds on the Platte River
In an effort to avoid litigation, environmentalists and farmers come together with federal and state agencies to address a wildlife crisis on the Platte River
The common beauty of a spring day
A spring day in Montana leads to an encounter with sandhill cranes, and with beauty
Era of the sage grouse is coming to an end
Tom Bell writes of his 70-year fascination with sage grouse, now on decline.
My great-grandfather the crow killer
The author’s family likes to think that his great-grandfather has come back as a crow after a lifetime spent shooting the rambunctious birds
Birdman’s biography soars
Cool North Wind: Morley Nelson’s Life with Birds of Prey by Stephen Stuebner tells the story of one of the most underrated and interesting conservationists in the West
84-year-old bird law no match for the military
Congress has exempted the U.S. military from an international law , the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, in a move environmentalists fear sets a bad precedent.
Golfers may oust eagles
The plan for a golf course and housing development on the Snake River near Jackson Hole, Wyo., would allow the developer to displace or kill up to 18 bald eagles.
Raptors won't fry away
A new agreement by the Fish and Wildlife Service and Minneapolis Xcel Energy could set a precedent for protecting more raptors from electrocution on power lines.
Evicted terns get new habitat
In an effort to help endangered salmon on the Columbia River, Caspian terns that prey on the fish are being lured to different habitat.
Snowy plover predators become prey
On the coast of Oregon, federal agencies have decided to start poisoning and killing the predators that steal the eggs of endangered snowy plovers.
Condor program laden with lead
Endangered condors reintroduced in the West are dying, many from lead poisoning caused by the bullets in the carcasses they feed on.
Can cows and grouse coexist on the range?
Colorado rancher Brad Phelps believes that cattle and sage grouse can live together, but biologists, environmentalists and other ranchers continue to argue over exactly what impact grazing has.
Chick-a-boom-boom at the lek
Male sage grouse gather at leks to dance in front of females in elaborate mating displays.
Last dance for the sage grouse?
Across the Interior West, as the sagebrush sea recedes under the environmental stress of human impacts, its emblematic bird, the sage grouse, is also in decline, and no one seems to know what to do about it.
Owl things considered
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated 4.6 billion acres in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah as critical habitat for the Mexican spotted owl, but the Center for Biological Diversity says that is not enough and plans to sue.
Of raptors, rats and roadkill
"Raptor Room News: A Non-Scientific Journal of Goings-On" is the voice of the Northern Rockies Raptor Center, which has been nursing injured birds back to health for 12 years.
Great Backyard Bird Count
The Great Backyard Bird Count takes place Feb. 16-19, 2001, sponsored by the National Audubon Society and Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology.
Toxic bird feed
Oregon biologist James Larison has found that 46 percent of the ptarmigans he tested had toxic levels of the trace metal cadmium in their kidneys.
Birds break boundaries
Chris Pague of The Nature Conservancy has been following migratory birds from Colorado to Mexico to help come up with a conservation plan.