Birds

Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering?
Why aren’t marbled murrelets recovering?
The enigmatic bird’s populations have not increased despite conservation efforts.
Latest: Long-term noise pollution gives birds PTSD
Latest: Long-term noise pollution gives birds PTSD
New research links natural gas compressors with physical impacts on birds.
Interior cancels decades-old protections for migratory birds
Interior cancels decades-old protections for migratory birds
The rollback prompts broad opposition from former officials from both political parties.
www.birdsource.com
A new Web site managed by the National Audubon Society and Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology helps birders.
A whir of wings
In November, New Mexico's Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge hosts its annual Festival of the Cranes.
Backpacks and quacks
Pintail ducks flying north from California's Central Valley this spring will carry transmitters to track their migration routes in an attempt to find out why pintail duck numbers are dropping.
Goose got your gander?
A skyrocketing population of once-uncommon Canada geese has some locals up-in-arms and ready to try lethal methods to bring goose numbers under control.
Tern terror
The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to figure out how to relocate the 10,000 pairs of Caspian terns nesting on Rice Island at the mouth of the Columbia - and eating millions of young salmon.
New tools for bird buffs
The "Colorado Breeding Bird Atlas" and a set of CD-Roms called "Better Birdwatching in Colorado" are excellent resources for Colorado birdwatchers.
Power poles make deadly perches
Kirk Hohenberger and other vocal raptor experts are pushing utility companies to make power poles safe for the birds that perch on them.
Are birds to blame for vanishing salmon?
On Rice Island at the mouth of the Columbia River near Astoria, Ore., the world's largest nesting colony of Caspian terns enthralls birders but worries others, who claim the birds are eating too many endangered salmon and steelhead smolts.
Birds bridge borders
The group Partners in Flight tries to stem the decline in the migrating bird populations of North and South America.
Snow geese have become too plentiful
Snow geese have become so plentiful that they are devouring their Canada tundra nesting grounds, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to greatly increase hunting and bring the population down.
Backyard birds
"Colorado's Wildlife Company," a report from the state Division of Wildlife, offers information for backyard birders.
The spotted owl has a new enemy
The barred owl has moved into the territory of the endangered spotted owl, and its tendency to compete with, prey on and occasionally mate with the spotted owl may doom the endangered bird.
Serious trouble for snow geese
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service increases bag limits on snow geese after biologists warn that the birds are too prolific for their own good.
It's a big bird
Eleven California condors released earlier in northern Arizona can be seen cruising the skies now over Grand Canyon and as far away as Moab, Utah.
Rid-a-Bird works too well
A small pest control company's product, Rid-a-Bird, is blamed in the deaths of two protected birds, a hawk and an owl, after Weyerhaeuser uses it to kill starlings at its Longview, Wash., paper mill.
Feds take on a sneaky species
One of the problems facing the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher can be found in the bird's nest, where the opportunistic cowbird sneaks in its own eggs, hatching offspring that out-compete the flycatcher's nestlings.
Agencies dunk endangered songbird
Biologists and conservationists protest BuRec's plan to drown habitat of the southwestern willow flycatcher by raising the waters of Arizona's Roosevelt Lake and by leaving other sensitive habitat areas off the list of designated critical habitat.
Crossing borders to save hawks
Biologist Brian Woodbridge tracks Swainson's hawks from California to Argentina, and discovers that many are being killed by pesticide-contaminated grasshoppers.
Coffee is bad for birds
Migrating songbirds are threatened as Mexican and Central American coffee plantations cut down shade trees to increase the coffee yield.
Sting nets bird killers
A two-year U.S. Fish and Wildlife sting nabs 35 individuals and businesses in the Southwest for killing and selling protected migratory birds.