Birds

Latest: 8 states sue Interior for rollbacks on migratory bird protections
Latest: 8 states sue Interior for rollbacks on migratory bird protections
States say the birds have economic, cultural and ecological value.
Students explore nature in densely built Los Angeles
Students explore nature in densely built Los Angeles
Educators hope this elementary school will foster a commitment to science and conservation.
We should all be more like ‘the bluebird man’
We should all be more like ‘the bluebird man’
Meet Al Larsen, a citizen scientist with decades of meticulous records of the West’s bluebirds.
Condor program laden with lead
Endangered condors reintroduced in the West are dying, many from lead poisoning caused by the bullets in the carcasses they feed on.
Can cows and grouse coexist on the range?
Colorado rancher Brad Phelps believes that cattle and sage grouse can live together, but biologists, environmentalists and other ranchers continue to argue over exactly what impact grazing has.
Chick-a-boom-boom at the lek
Male sage grouse gather at leks to dance in front of females in elaborate mating displays.
Last dance for the sage grouse?
Across the Interior West, as the sagebrush sea recedes under the environmental stress of human impacts, its emblematic bird, the sage grouse, is also in decline, and no one seems to know what to do about it.
Owl things considered
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated 4.6 billion acres in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah as critical habitat for the Mexican spotted owl, but the Center for Biological Diversity says that is not enough and plans to sue.
Of raptors, rats and roadkill
"Raptor Room News: A Non-Scientific Journal of Goings-On" is the voice of the Northern Rockies Raptor Center, which has been nursing injured birds back to health for 12 years.
Great Backyard Bird Count
The Great Backyard Bird Count takes place Feb. 16-19, 2001, sponsored by the National Audubon Society and Cornell University's Laboratory of Ornithology.
Toxic bird feed
Oregon biologist James Larison has found that 46 percent of the ptarmigans he tested had toxic levels of the trace metal cadmium in their kidneys.
Birds break boundaries
Chris Pague of The Nature Conservancy has been following migratory birds from Colorado to Mexico to help come up with a conservation plan.
www.birdsource.com
A new Web site managed by the National Audubon Society and Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology helps birders.
A whir of wings
In November, New Mexico's Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge hosts its annual Festival of the Cranes.
Backpacks and quacks
Pintail ducks flying north from California's Central Valley this spring will carry transmitters to track their migration routes in an attempt to find out why pintail duck numbers are dropping.
Goose got your gander?
A skyrocketing population of once-uncommon Canada geese has some locals up-in-arms and ready to try lethal methods to bring goose numbers under control.
Tern terror
The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to figure out how to relocate the 10,000 pairs of Caspian terns nesting on Rice Island at the mouth of the Columbia - and eating millions of young salmon.
New tools for bird buffs
The "Colorado Breeding Bird Atlas" and a set of CD-Roms called "Better Birdwatching in Colorado" are excellent resources for Colorado birdwatchers.
Power poles make deadly perches
Kirk Hohenberger and other vocal raptor experts are pushing utility companies to make power poles safe for the birds that perch on them.
Are birds to blame for vanishing salmon?
On Rice Island at the mouth of the Columbia River near Astoria, Ore., the world's largest nesting colony of Caspian terns enthralls birders but worries others, who claim the birds are eating too many endangered salmon and steelhead smolts.
Birds bridge borders
The group Partners in Flight tries to stem the decline in the migrating bird populations of North and South America.
Snow geese have become too plentiful
Snow geese have become so plentiful that they are devouring their Canada tundra nesting grounds, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to greatly increase hunting and bring the population down.
Backyard birds
"Colorado's Wildlife Company," a report from the state Division of Wildlife, offers information for backyard birders.
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