Archive

How the Keep it in the Ground movement came to be
How the Keep it in the Ground movement came to be
A look back at a decade of coverage of anti-fossil fuel protests.
Exploding oil train, heroin highways and the EPA’s civil rights record
Horse catheters in classrooms, a crackdown on toxics, and an update on the Animas River
Longtime foes practice ritual combat in an Idaho forest
The writer goes to central Idaho to visit the heart of the longest-standing Earth First! demonstration, protesting the Cove-Mallard timber sale.
The Land and Water Fund waits to be tapped
Although the money in the Land and Water Conservation Trust Fund is usually taken for other purposes, this year Congress has agreed to spend the conservation trust fund for land and water conservation.
Private rights vs. public lands
Private rights vs. public lands
A ranching family's desire to develop a road to an inholding in Arizona's Arrastra Mounain Wilderness is a microcosm of the huge and unwieldy problem of inholdings on public lands throughout the West.
Haggling over the Grand Staircase-Escalante
Conoco gives up on oil well in Utah's Grand Staircase, but the state School Trust Lands board is insisting that its land - checkerboarded through the monument - must be managed to earn money for the schools, and that may involve oil and gas drilling.
Deconstructing the age of dams
California rice farmers decide to destroy salmon-blocking dams in their Sacramento Valley irrigation district.
If a town is more dead than alive, it's the Old West
Musing on the gravestones in Anaconda, Mont., a writer theorizes that one can tell whether a town is Old West or New West by the ratio of the buried to the currently alive inhabitants.
The West may not be literary, but it's littered with reading matter
A cross-country bicycle trip through the West reveals quirky and sometimes enigmatic road signs everywhere.
Bringing back the bighorn
The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep has fought its way back from near extinction, but efforts to reintroduce it to all its former range are more difficult than they appear.
Bees under siege
Honeybees across the West - and the nation - are dying in huge numbers, and some think a pesticide, methyl parathion, may be the primary killer.
El Nuevo West
Spanish-speaking, often underestimated immigrant workers keep the West's ski resorts running in the face of INS raids, discrimination and other trials.
Has big money doomed direct democracy?
The use of initiatives and referenda - direct democracy - to change the law for environmental reasons faces a challenge when big money enters the picture.
1996: Clinton takes a 1.7 million-acre stand in Utah
1996: Clinton takes a 1.7 million-acre stand in Utah
President Bill Clinton uses the Antiquities Act of 1906 to designate a new 1.7 million-acre national monument in southern Utah, and reactions range from joy to indignation and outrage.
The bigger the mine, the better the deal
Land swaps, like the one planned to save land near Yellowstone National Park from mining, are a bad habit with a bad history in Montana's national forests.
What is a Navajo taco?
Curiosity leads a writer to research the origins of Taco Time's "Navajo Taco."
Catron County's politics heat up as its land goes bankrupt
Catron County, N.M., the home of the county independence movement, is a study of contrasts - its people heavily dependent on the federal government and its land and rivers dying.
A few modest principles to help us manage Utah's public lands
The Old West and the New West need to work together in trying to preserve the far-from-pristine West that still remains.
1995: Did toxic stew cook the goose?
The deaths of 342 migrating snow geese in Montana's Berkeley Pit are blamed on the pit's toxicity by environmentalists, although the mine disputes it.
I like to hunt, but I don't like to kill
A writer muses on the contradictions inherent in his love for the hunt but dislike of killing animals.
How the West was won, and won, and ...
A look at history shows a cycle in the rise and fall of Western wise-use movements and sagebrush rebellions.
Colorado's prison slayer
Small businessman Tom Huerkamp fights the building of prisons in the rural West and looks for other ways to generate an economy.
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