Archive

How the Keep it in the Ground movement came to be
How the Keep it in the Ground movement came to be
A look back at a decade of coverage of anti-fossil fuel protests.
Exploding oil train, heroin highways and the EPA’s civil rights record
Horse catheters in classrooms, a crackdown on toxics, and an update on the Animas River
This bird fills more niches than a cowpie has bugs
The author reflects in magpies.
Download entire issue
... to read the essays, news stories and other articles in the issue, including the sampling below
The 1992 Election: Nationally a revolution, in the West an evolution
The West has come late and gradually to the experience of cultural diversity and aggressive minorities. But the 1992 election tells us that the region is finally experiencing what it means to be part of America in the late 20th century.
In Utah, pavers hit speed bump
In yet another chapter of the Sagebrush Rebellion in southeastern Utah, two rural counties are trying to a force the federal government to allow construction of the Book Cliffs Highway across some of the state's wildest land.
The West's nuclear Mandarins have reaped what they sowed
To those of us who grew up in the 1950s reading I.F. Stone's Weekly, with its regular exposes of the dangers of above-ground nuclear testing, the accompanying coverups and denials, and the silence of the mass media on those subjects, the end of all nuclear testing is a shock.
Download entire issue
... to read the essays, news stories and other articles in the issue, including the sampling below
The nuclear age: 1945, the beginning; 1992, the beginning of the end
The atomic age began with a big bang. The buildup to the Cold War took place in a few short years. But the struggle over its legacy and lessons for humanity have just begun.
Eugene: A gathering of green energy
Eugene, Ore., boasts a concentration of conservationists perhaps unmatched in the rest of the country.
A remembrance of William Penn Mott
When I heard that former National Park Service Director William Penn Molt died last month, my first thought was, "At least he lived long enough to see a wolf in Yellowstone."
Download entire issue
... to read the essays, news stories and other articles in the issue, including the sampling below
Water: Fear of Supreme Court leads tribes to accept an adverse decision
A decision by the Wind River Indian Reservation tribes not to appeal an adverse Wyoming Supreme Court water decision in June signals -- at least for the moment -- an end to litigation launched nearly 16 years ago by the state of Wyoming.
Miners stake out a golf course in Idaho
Members of the Idaho Conservation League pounded a wooden stake into the grass of a posh golf course here to prove that even Sun Valley resorts are vulnerable to mineral exploration under the nation's old mining law.
Download entire issue
... to read the essays, news stories and other articles in the issue, including the sampling below
Western voters face clear choices
The 1992 election will redraw the West's political map, but the new shape is almost impossible to predict.
Radioactive dollars draw tribes
The U.S. Department of Energy continues to dangle the carrot of nuclear waste storage, along with money to study the idea, before the hungry eyes of Indian tribes and rural counties in the West.
Download entire issue
... to read the essays, news stories and other articles in the issue, including the sampling below
Indian land claims deserve our support
The presence of the 24,000-acre Pueblo of Sandia prevents the city of Albuquerque from sprawling into the nearby foothills to the south. Nevertheless, the environmental community in northern new Mexico is fighting the tribe's attempt to reclaim its land from the U.S. Forest Service.
Battle for the Bones
Today, across the West, scientists, rockhounds and those who collect for profit are battling over the bones of the 100-million-year-old wildlife of the Mesozoic.
Yellowstone forces to shoot rogue tourists after relocation fails
National Park Service officials today confirmed reports of the shooting of two tourists in Yellowstone Park early this season. The shootings were authorized under a newly implemented policy to protect bears.
Should the 'Frank' be one forest?
An influential congressman's proposal to create the nation's first all-wilderness national forest in central Idaho has the Forest Service scrambling.
High Country News Classifieds