Archaeology

What is lost when cultural sites are bulldozed?
What is lost when cultural sites are bulldozed?
Southwestern tribes learn of possible heritage destruction at the hands of Arizona State Parks and Trails.
The Air Force wants to expand into Nevada’s wild desert
The Air Force wants to expand into Nevada’s wild desert
A 300,000-acre base expansion would push into intact bighorn sheep habitat.
Monument reductions threaten future dinosaur discoveries
Monument reductions threaten future dinosaur discoveries
Digs are imperiled by Trump’s move to slash protections for public land.
Efforts to save Utah's Cedar Mesa reach a crescendo
Efforts to save Utah's Cedar Mesa reach a crescendo
Conflicting county and state proposals would provide various levels of protection.
Still quiet at Canyons of the Ancients
Still quiet at Canyons of the Ancients
Modest increases in visitation and infrastructure since this Colorado monument designation in 2000.
Drilling Chaco: What's actually at stake
Drilling Chaco: What's actually at stake
It's the archaeological landscape beyond New Mexico's Chaco Canyon that is most threatened.
Chronicling the work of an early Native American artist
Chronicling the work of an early Native American artist
Review of ‘In Search of Nampeyo: The Early Years, 1875-1892’ by Steve Elmore.
Fracking Georgia O'Keeffe Country
Fracking Georgia O'Keeffe Country
Drill rigs pop up near Navajo communities, Chaco Canyon and the iconic Black Place.
A long-submerged town becomes visible
A long-submerged town becomes visible
Water recedes under drought conditions and reveals a lost California community.
Lake Mead's retreat leaves Nevada ghost town high and dry
Lake Mead's retreat leaves Nevada ghost town high and dry
The residents of St. Thomas were forced to leave their homes behind when Lake Mead submerged their town. But after decades under water, drought has brought it back to the surface.
Technology eases access to ancient ruins, for better or worse
Technology eases access to ancient ruins, for better or worse
A writer uses the Internet and GPS to find secret Ancestral Puebloan dwellings and other wonders on Utah’s Cedar Mesa, home of the country’s highest concentration of archaeological sites.
In search of camas, a Native American food staple
In search of camas, a Native American food staple
Botanist Madrona Murphy traces long-lost edible wild plant gardens cultivated by the Pacific Northwest's Coast Salish.
Historic plant cultivation in Northwest native tribes
Historic plant cultivation in Northwest native tribes
Lying to rest a dispute over whether tribal reliance on fish meant they did not garden.
Three days in the Four Corners
Three days in the Four Corners
A loop around the Four Corners, where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah meet, leads into a land of both historical and geological friction.
How to return a pot
How to return a pot
The BLM offers advice for those who decide to return pilfered artifacts.
Lessons from the mighty Maya
Lessons from the mighty Maya
Modern-day Americans could learn a lesson from the collapse of the ancient Mayan civilization.
The missing puzzle piece
The missing puzzle piece
In southwestern Colorado’s Crow Canyon, archaeologists are working with Native Americans to solve the historical mysteries of the Four Corners area.
The great giveaway
The great giveaway
Brand-new resource management plans from Utah’s BLM welcome ATVs and energy development onto some of the state’s most fragile land.
Pillaging the Past
Craig Childs explores the fine line that separates archeology from grave-robbing in the American Southwest.
Destruction and discovery walk hand in hand
A new plan to steer energy development away from cultural sites in New Mexico could streamline energy development, fund archaeological research and preserve ancient sites all at once
Nine reasons why a river is good for the soul
A writer on a river trip through canyon country muses on things like sand, rapids, ruins and time, as well as the joy that comes from being outside in the company of family and friends
Out of the Four Corners
Susan Ryan, a young archaeologist, has some unusual ideas about why the Anasazi left their homes in the Southwest, 700 years ago
Suburbia blasts through a national monument
A rocky western escarpment and the Petroglyph National Monument have long held back Albuquerque’s sprawl, but now the Volcano Heights development is coming, and a controversial road through the monument may be built
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