Agriculture

Farmers and ranchers lose vital support during shutdown
Farmers and ranchers lose vital support during shutdown
The funding stalemate has halted Department of Agriculture programs that the rural West relies on.
After natural disasters, workers rebuild — and face exploitation
After natural disasters, workers rebuild — and face exploitation
Immigrant workers and day laborers are especially vulnerable to health risks and wage theft.
What the 2018 farm bill means for the West
What the 2018 farm bill means for the West
Lawmakers see hemp legalization and conservation funding as the big wins.
Bees don't grow on trees
Honeybees are in trouble, and so are the farmers who depend on them for pollination, especially in California’s almond orchards
California's farmers ditch dirty diesel pumps
California’s two largest utility companies are encouraging farmers to switch from polluting diesel irrigation pumps to electric ones
Failure of leadership, not a lack of water, dooms the Klamath River
Only the federal government can find away to protect both salmon and farmers in the Northwest’s Klamath River watershed
Communities search for a safer way to kill mosquitoes
In Colorado and elsewhere in the West, the fear of West Nile Virus brings the controversy about spraying pesticides to a boil
Biology: The missing science
Studies by Montana’s Andrew Hansen and Colorado’s Rick Knight offer some of the first scientific evidence that preserving ranch lands provides important benefits to surrounding ecosystems
Not just a ranch: Bucks and acres
Carl Palmer hopes to make his Adobe Ranch in California an economic success to prove that open space can be financially as well as environmentally valuable
Who will take over the ranch?
As private lands become the new frontier in the West’s wild real estate frenzy, ranchers are turning to land trusts in places like Gunnison, Colo., to find out how to hold on to their land and keep it open and undeveloped
Ranching's worst enemy? It's not greens
Western ranchers rejoice when a federal court jury finds that the nation’s largest meatpacker, Tyson/IBP, has illegally squeezed $1.28 billion from independent cattle producers
Postscript to a water war
Nearly a decade after Imperial Valley irrigators fought off a water grab by Texans Ed and Lee Bass, the Imperial Valley Irrigation District buys the old Bass property, Western Farms, and the water rights that come with it
Salmon get a break from pesticides
U.S. District Judge John Coughenour bans the use of 38 pesticides near streams that host endangered runs of salmon and steelhead in Washington, Oregon and California
Agriculture’s wild side
In Farming with the Wild: Enhancing Biodiversity on Farms and Ranches, Daniel Imhoff discusses what’s wrong with industrialized agriculture and offers suggestions on how to fix it.
Grazing foes float a buyout
Anti-grazing groups are trying to convince Congress to buy out ranchers' grazing allotments on public land, but resistance on the part of permit holders may stop the effort.
Go west, fruit picker
Disappearing jobs in the hard-hit apple orchards of eastern Washington have led to a flood of displaced migrant workers moving west toward Seattle.
Showdown on the Nevada range
The Sagebrush Rebellion smolders when the BLM impounds and tries to auction off cattle owned by ranchers Ben Colvin and Jack Vogt for refusing to pay for grazing allotments.
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