High Country News - Wildlife

Dear Michael Dombeck
Biologists and botanists from 30 different forests have written a letter to new Chief Michael Dombeck, saying the agency's ability to achieve its conservation goals is seriously hampered by budget cuts.
Following the salmon
The new "Northwest Salmon Recovery Report" provides an independent voice on regional salmon issues.
Cry Wolf
Review of "The Great American Wolf" by Bruce Hampton
Wolves have friend in Washington
Washington's Congressman Norm Dicks is pushing for the reintroduction of wolves in his district's Olympic National Park.
No takers for wilderness trip
Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt tries to calm the state's bitter wilderness debate with a camping trip in proposed wilderness area - but no one wants to come.
Timber mill dreams of museum
Hull-Oakes Lumber Company wants to make a museum of a 90-year-old mill near Monroe, Ore., but environmentalists believe the company's stipulating that it get subsidized timber at the mill won't wash.
Judge is bullish on trout protection
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service starts the process of listing the bull trout under the Endangered Species Act.
Coffee is bad for birds
Migrating songbirds are threatened as Mexican and Central American coffee plantations cut down shade trees to increase the coffee yield.
Rancher shoots for test case
Meeteetse, Wyo., rancher Martin Thomas will argue in court that he was justified in gunning down nine elk with an assault rifle because of the threat of brucellosis to cattle.
Frogs sport too many legs
Scientists say the eight-legged frogs showing up in western Oregon are probably victims of a trematode parasite.
A Utah vendetta
Utah politicians, angry at actor Robert Redford's support of the controversial new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, pass a resolution to turn Redford's Sundance resort into a wilderness.
Loggers sued for fatal landslide
The relatives of four people killed in a landslide in Douglas County, Ore., last November are suing two logging companies for clearcutting the hills above the victims' home and contributing to the landslide.
Coyotes could get culled
Biologist Alan Clark believes that the only way to help the declining population of the endangered Columbia white-tailed deer is to begin to kill coyotes on the Washington wildlife refuge the deer live on.
Tarnished trophies
PEER's report, "Tarnished Trophies," documents how safari hunters bring exotic and endangered animals into the U.S. as game trophies.
Wanted alive
The Colorado Division of Wildlife is distributing posters to ask the public to keep its eyes open for the fast-disappearing boreal toad.
No more cheap thrills
A General Accounting Office report shows the Forest Service is losing millions of dollars a year by undercharging the recreationists that use forest lands.
Idaho activists win one
A federal judge in Idaho overturns the 1995 conviction of 12 activists charged with violating a road closure in the Cove-Mallard area.
Who shot the wolf?
A male gray wolf reintroduced into the Yellowstone area was found shot and dumped into Montana's Madison River.
Outdoor writer aims to change his culture
A review of Ted Williams' "The Insightful Sportsman" reveals a fiercely independent outdoor writer who is not afraid to upset his fellow hunters.
Judge chastises forest plan defendant
Option 9 Northwest forest planners violated open-meeting laws.