High Country News - Climate

Will Western skies be clear enough?
The Western Regional Air Partnership has a plan to clear the air over the Colorado Plateau, but critics say the plan is much too soft and likely to prove ineffective.
Cement glues citizens together
Pueblo, Colo., citizens, who worked for years to restore air and water polluted by their city's one-time steel mills, now fear a planned cement manufacturing plant will make their newly livable community unlivable and polluted once again.
Composting takes out the trash
California has cut its landfill waste by 40 percent, and some give composting the credit.
Dumping diesel
Southern California is trying to reduce diesel emissions by turning to cleaner-burning energy sources for public vehicles.
Mining tops toxic list
Hardrock mining tops the list of industrial polluters in the EPA's annual Toxics Release Inventory.
Cooling the waters
The EPA orders the Potlatch Corp. pulp mill in Lewiston, Idaho, to cool its wastewater and reduce its pollution of the Snake River.
A spick-and-span plan
The state of Oregon has ordered Portland to reduce sewage overflow into the Willamette River by 94 percent by 2011, but City Commissioner Dan Saltzman says the pollution problem is more complex than that.
Clean-air program may suffocate
In Washington, a tax-slashing ballot initiative is going to hurt the state's clean-air program.
Desert development raises dust
In Phoenix, Ariz., cases of "Valley Fever" are rising as rapid development stirs up pathogens in the area's dust.
Mohave agrees to clean up its act
The Mohave Generating Station in southern Nevada agrees to clean up its operation, which has been notorious for fouling the air over Arizona's Grand Canyon.
A lasting chemical legacy
The video, "A Toxic Train Runs Through It," investigates the long-lasting health impacts of a 1996 trail derailment and toxic chemical spill in Alberton, Montana.
House of Garbage
A new house in Missoula, Mont., showcases recycled building materials.
Drought for the Northwest
Drought ahead for the Northwest in summer.
Erosion danger fans flames
A clean-air activist who helped end bluegrass-field burning near Spokane, Wash., is now tackling the practice of wheat-stubble burning on eastern Washington's farmlands.
L-P's problems mount
The EPA indicts Louisiana-Pacific for its Olathe, Colo., waferboard plant's pollution.
Shifting sands in Navajoland
On the drought-stricken Navajo Nation, scientist Margaret Hiza Redsteer studies the movement of sand dunes.
Trash talk
A new edition of "Rubbish! The Archaeology of Garbage" by William Rathje and Cullen Murphy, reports the fascinating findings of the University of Arizona's "Garbage Project."
Pollution pickle sours landowner
Cleaning up asbestos-laden soil around a warehouse owned by the Minot, N.D., Park District may cost the district a lot, with the previous owner long gone and the source of the asbestos, W.R. Grace, now bankrupt.
All's fair in smog and waste?
A new Web site created by the Oakland, Calif., nonprofit Environmental Defense gathers information about environmental and health dangers in any community in the U.S.
The smog is lifting
After decades of cleanup efforts, Denver, Colo., is about to receive clean-air status from the Environmental Protection Agency.