Issues

Kaiparowits coal power plans scuttled
Kaiparowits coal power plans scuttled
Southern California Edison has backed down from its plan to construct the controversial 3,000 megawatt Kaiparowits coal-fired power plant in central Utah, citing increasing costs, environmental constraints, and pending regulatory legislation.
'Either we share it or we lose it'
'Either we share it or we lose it'
The proposal to designate a big chunk of wild land in Idaho as the River of No Return Wilderness has created new conflicts that jeopardize the land's longstanding wild character.
Jackson Hole wrestles with growth
Jackson Hole wrestles with growth
Jackson Hole officials have tried to shape and slow the rapid growth sparked by the opening of the Teton Village Ski Area in 1966, but their efforts haven't been enough.
Saving swamps for ducks and men
Saving swamps for ducks and men
Although swamps have historically been viewed as unattractive and worthless, a building movement -- buoyed by federal laws -- recognizes wetlands as havens for wildlife that also hold and purify water used by humans.
Salesmen with sun power woo West
Salesmen with sun power woo West
The solar energy industry is a booming business, containing all of the perils of rapid growth -- fast-buck men, scant history, few standards and regulations, and consumer confusion.
BLM farm plans hold promise, problems
BLM farm plans hold promise, problems
Lack of clear goals for Idaho agriculture becomes more evident as the U.S. Bureau of Land Management wrestles with plans to convert thousands of acres of desert lands managed by that agency into individual private farms sanctioned by the Desert Land Act and the Carey Act.
Donkey dilemma damages public land
Donkey dilemma damages public land
Damage to sensitive desert ecosystems is causing some to take a hard look at the Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971, which was the first time Congress gave full protection to a non-native species animal.
Court lifts Powder River injunction
Court lifts Powder River injunction
The U.S. Supreme Court has lifted an injunction barring four coal companies and a railroad from proceeding with coal development in Wyoming's eastern Powder River Basin, opening the way to full-scale development of the region's coal.
Toilets: a revolution from the bottom up
Toilets: a revolution from the bottom up
A look at alternative toilets -- such as composting toilets that eliminate water consumption -- and a brief explanation of how they work and their chief advantages and disadvantages.
NEPA at stake?
NEPA at stake?
After losing a lawsuit involving grazing allotments, the Bureau of Land Management has expressed concern that the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) -- considered to be the country's most important environmental law -- is making the agency vulnerable to lawsuits that drain time and resources, raising questions about that law's future.
People want power over transmission
People want power over transmission
More and more rural residents are starting to resent transmission lines as the lines proliferate across the open spaces of the West, marring the scenery, hindering farm operations, and producing ozone, which may be harmful to crops.
Phosphate-hungry world after Idaho
Phosphate-hungry world after Idaho
A rush for phosphate in Idaho could mean 22,000 new residents, a substantial loss of wildlife habitat, increased air pollution, and an uncertain future for two resident endangered species.
BN proposes fertilizer from coal
BN proposes fertilizer from coal
Near the remote ranching community of Circle, Montana, the Burlington Northern railroad company plans to construct a coal gasification plant that would produce not only natural gas but also fertilizer.
Battle over Teton jetport still rages
Battle over Teton jetport still rages
Two years after public hearings, the National Park Service is still embroiled in a national controversy over whether or not to allow the establishment of a commercial jetport in Grant Teton National Park in Wyoming.
S.D. farmers fight Oahe Diversion
S.D. farmers fight Oahe Diversion
The Bureau of Reclamation's Oahe Diversion Project, ballyhooed for nearly 30 years as the savior of South Dakota's family farm agricultural economy, is now being bitterly opposed by many of its supposed beneficiaries as construction begins.
TVA moves West for fuel
TVA moves West for fuel
As the Tennessee Valley Authority rapidly expands its electric generation with nuclear power, it has interests in exploring and mining uranium in Wyoming, New Mexico, and other Western states.
Does the nation need Western coal?
Does the nation need Western coal?
Industry says the West's thick, low-sulfur coal seams are they key to America's abundant energy, while conservationists push for more equitable distribution of mining throughout the country. In this issue, HCN presents three different views on the options.
Governors unite on energy rights
Governors unite on energy rights
Several Western governors convened recently to hammer out general policies on energy issues for the region, striking a tone of "states' rights" in relation to the national government.
Power plant ahead
Power plant ahead
Wheatland, Wyoming, has so far dodged the energy boom, but it may be the future home of the Missouri Basin Power Project, a 1,500 megawatt coal-fired power plant.
Wilderness endangered by overuse
Wilderness endangered by overuse
Most people believe wilderness should be left alone. But as more and more people use it, active management becomes necessary.
High Country News Classifieds