Issues

Wood stove revival puts damper on energy costs
Wood stove revival puts damper on energy costs
Today, with rising energy costs, wood burning is probably the fastest growing form of alternative renewable energy use.
Idaho legislature axes conservation programs
Idaho legislature axes conservation programs
The forced resignation of Earl Adams, the director of Idaho's Office of Energy, was the coup de grace in a long line of attacks by a hostile Republican-controlled legislature against efforts to set up a state energy conservation policy.
Wheatland: the model boom town?
Wheatland: the model boom town?
The Missouri Basin Power Project, a consortium of utilities, hopes to use construction of a 1,500 megawatt coal-fired power plant in Wheatland, Wyoming, as an example of industry turning a rural community into a lively place to live.
Rest-rotation range plan -- panacea of problem?
Rest-rotation range plan -- panacea of problem?
Both critics and advocates are weighing in on the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's drive to improve deteriorating range conditions on public lands in the West through a grazing system known as rest-rotation.
Domestic technology offers low-income people opportunity
Domestic technology offers low-income people opportunity
At a time when energy prices are making it increasingly difficult for people to make ends meet, Malcolm Lillywhite shows people simple technology that they can use to produce quality food and shelter at low cost.
Utah oil shale boom: not if, but when
Utah oil shale boom: not if, but when
Unknowns are plaguing oil shale development southwest of Vernal, Utah, but the burst of optimism for oil shale in the early 1970s has many local residents saying that extraction of oil from their abundant rock is inevitable.
Boulder adopts plan to slow growth
Boulder adopts plan to slow growth
Boulder, Colorado, has become the first community in the Rocky Mountain West to attempt to slow down its growth rate by city ordinance, which will limit the amount of new housing.
Uranium experiment moves into northeast Colorado
Uranium experiment moves into northeast Colorado
Residents of Weld County, Colorado, are worried that proposed uranium mining in the area will destroy farmland.
Telluride blues, a hatchet job
Telluride blues, a hatchet job
Telluride, Colorado, formerly an honest, decayed little mining town of about 300 souls, is now a bustling whore of a ski resort with a population of 1,500 and many more to come.
Rocks, rivers, snakes, solitude -- Owyhee
Rocks, rivers, snakes, solitude -- Owyhee
Two spectacular river gorges in southwest Idaho -- the Owyhee and the Bruneau -- are being considered for study as possible national wild and scenic rivers, with surrounding primitive areas.
Joy, shipmates, joy!
Joy, shipmates, joy!
Excerpts from a speech delivered by Edward Abbey at a conference in Vail, Colorado. "I say the industrialization of the Rocky Mountain West is not inevitable and that to plan for such a catastrophe is to invite it ..."
Women face boom town isolation
Women face boom town isolation
In remote Jeffrey City, Wyoming, owned and operated by Western Nuclear, some women are determined to get out and participate in activities while others prefer the refuge of their homes.
John Wesley Powell tests El Dorado
John Wesley Powell tests El Dorado
John Wesley Powell told the hard truth about the West, but his advice for a more considerate approach to westward expansion was widely scorned and largely rejected.
Shell says, 'We'll plan -- our way'
Shell says, 'We'll plan -- our way'
Residents of the tiny mountain community of Shell, Wyoming, emerged from an unlikely planning meeting with smiles on their faces, having created a land-use plan that apparently satisfied even those who were most opposed.
Northern Cheyenne want Class I air
Northern Cheyenne want Class I air
The Northern Cheyenne Indian tribe in southern Montana has become the first land manager to ask the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to allow it to keep its air clean with a Class I designation, which would affect the planned expansion of the Colstrip coal-fired power plant.
San Luis Valley shows rural ingenuity
San Luis Valley shows rural ingenuity
Residents of southern Colorado's San Luis Valley aren't waiting for federal or state lawmakers to solve their energy problems. They have taken the matter into their own hands, and have several dozen working solar systems as proof of their success.
An invitation to a very strange place
An invitation to a very strange place
Wyoming's Red Desert, full of grotesque geologic structures and thousands of greasewood-studded lake beds that dry to great expanses of red crust, is a strange place in need of defenders.
Designating wilderness -- asking for destruction?
Designating wilderness -- asking for destruction?
Land that is scenic, well-watered, and with recreation opportunities will be heavily used regardless of whether or not it is designated as wilderness. Many wilderness areas receive little use at all.
Navajo Nation faces development
Navajo Nation faces development
The Bureau of Reclamation's Navajo Indian Irrigation Project brings modern, irrigated agriculture to a parched landscape -- and the possibility of large-scale industry that could compete for the water.
House bill prompts public lands alert
House bill prompts public lands alert
A coalition of 19 conservation organizations warns that the proposed Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) of 1976 would severely limit the federal government's ability to protect long-term natural resource values, putting the nation's public lands at risk.
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