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Restoring a refuge: Cows depart, but can antelope recover? November 24, 1997

Restoring a refuge: Cows depart, but can antelope recover?

Oregon's Hart Mountain Antelope Refuge seems to be recovering now that cattle have been banned from it - but despite the lush grasses, the antelope are still in decline.

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Drain Lake Powell? Democracy and science finally come West November 10, 1997

Drain Lake Powell? Democracy and science finally come West

The proposal to drain Lake Powell is exhilarating because of the debate it will inspire: A careful study of the history of the Colorado River Basin and Glen Canyon Dam reveals that the hated dam may have had some good consequences, while those who remember and still mourn for drowned Glen Canyon find new allies in the fight to destroy the dam and restore the canyon.

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Deconstructing the age of dams October 27, 1997

Deconstructing the age of dams

California rice farmers decide to destroy salmon-blocking dams in their Sacramento Valley irrigation district.

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The land is still public, but it's no longer free October 13, 1997

The land is still public, but it's no longer free

The federal government's new Recreational Fee Demonstration Program - which requires recreationists to "pay to play" in national parks, forests, BLM and Fish and Wildlife areas nationwide - receives both condemnation and kudos in its early trials.

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The timber wars evolve into a divisive attempt at peace September 29, 1997

The timber wars evolve into a divisive attempt at peace

The Quincy Library Group's controversial forest plan comes out of a long struggle for consensus, and many environmentalists worry that the plan and its passage into law will set a dangerous precedent.

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Yellowstone at 125: The park as a sovereign state September 15, 1997

Yellowstone at 125: The park as a sovereign state

As Yellowstone National Park celebrates its 125th birthday, it continues to struggle with the surrounding states over wildlife management and other questions, including whether "natural regulation" is letting the park's elk herds overgraze their ranges.

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Radioactive waste from Hanford is seeping toward the Columbia September 01, 1997

Radioactive waste from Hanford is seeping toward the Columbia

Two whistleblowers - safety auditor Casey Ruud and geophysicist John Brodeur - find that radioactive waste from some of the biggest, leaking storage tanks has already reached groundwater and is heading toward the Columbia River.

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The West that was, and the West that can be August 18, 1997

The West that was, and the West that can be

A close look at the history of the West reveals that human beings have meddled with and sometimes changed the landscape for as long as they have lived on the continent.

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Vanishing habitat August 04, 1997

Vanishing habitat

Who wins and who loses when Uncle Sam cuts deals with landowners to protect endangered species with Habitat Conservation Plans -- the latest attempt to balance private-property rights with the protection of endangered species?

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While the New West booms, Wyoming mines, drills ... and languishes July 07, 1997

While the New West booms, Wyoming mines, drills ... and languishes

The state of Wyoming remains stuck in the Old West and trapped by its myths and boom-and-bust cycles, while outside its boundaries the New West comes to life.

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On the trail of mining's corporate nomads June 23, 1997

On the trail of mining's corporate nomads

The copper mining company Summo USA's plans to mine in northern New Mexico and Lisbon Valley, Utah, lead a reporter to follow what happens when local communities resist - and don't resist - a hardrock mining project.

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Chaos comes to Costilla County June 09, 1997

Chaos comes to Costilla County

Costilla County, Colorado's attempts to rein in logging and gain access to the Taylor Ranch their Hispanic forebears used as a commons are frustrated by a wave of mostly Anglo newcomers who want no part of any planning regulations.

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The sacred and profane collide in the West May 26, 1997

The sacred and profane collide in the West

The growing desire of Native Americans to protect their sacred sites in the West leads to sometimes acrimonious debate over public access, the First Amendment and the definition of sacred places.

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Planning under the gun: Cleaning up Lake Tahoe proves to be a dirty business May 12, 1997

Planning under the gun: Cleaning up Lake Tahoe proves to be a dirty business

Is the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency going to clean up beleaguered Lake Tahoe and its surroundings - or simply drive a wedge between the elite and the working class in the community?

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Evangelical Christians preach a green gospel April 28, 1997

Evangelical Christians preach a green gospel

A new breed of green Evangelical Christians seeks to spread the good news of Bible-based environmentalism to their conservative fellow Christians.

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Beauty and the Beast: The president's new monument forces southern Utah to face its tourism future April 14, 1997

Beauty and the Beast: The president's new monument forces southern Utah to face its tourism future

As the small, conservative towns bordering Utah's new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument begin to adapt to the monument they never wanted, a new vision for what gateway communities and preserved areas might be begins to slowly emerge.

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Big Sky, big mess in Montana March 31, 1997

Big Sky, big mess in Montana

A Montana ski resort originally created by newsman Chet Huntley and intended to be a model of free-market, unconstrained development, is today a morass of lawsuits, environmental degradation and inefficiency.

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Working the Watershed March 17, 1997

Working the Watershed

An unusual group founded by environmentalists and logging companies, the Willapa Alliance seeks to bring economic and ecological healing to Washington's Willapa Bay.

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Hunters close ranks, and minds March 03, 1997

Hunters close ranks, and minds

The notorious self-censorship the hunting press showed when "Outdoor Life" pulled biologist Tom Beck's article critical of bear baiting leads to speculations by an outdoor writer on why hunters are so thin-skinned about criticism.

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No home on the range February 17, 1997

No home on the range

The deliberate slaughter of bison straying from Yellowstone National Park - killed because the brucellosis they may carry might endanger livestock - provokes a storm of protest, and calls into question the concept of wildlife management in the park.

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Bringing back the bighorn February 03, 1997

Bringing back the bighorn

The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep has fought its way back from near extinction, but efforts to reintroduce it to all its former range are more difficult than they appear.

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Bees under siege January 20, 1997

Bees under siege

Honeybees across the West - and the nation - are dying in huge numbers, and some think a pesticide, methyl parathion, may be the primary killer.

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El Nuevo West December 23, 1996

El Nuevo West

Spanish-speaking, often underestimated immigrant workers keep the West's ski resorts running in the face of INS raids, discrimination and other trials.

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Motorheads: The new, noisy, organized force in the West December 09, 1996

Motorheads: The new, noisy, organized force in the West

Well-organized and well-heeled, off-road vehicle users constitute a large and powerful group aiming to stake its claim to the West's public lands.

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Pollution in paradise November 25, 1996

Pollution in paradise

Idaho's beautiful Silver Valley and Lake Coeur d'Alene build a new resort economy on a toxic stew of mining waste.

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