Fresh minds join the fold

We welcome three new editorial interns, albeit remotely.

 

HCN's new interns, from left, Jessica Douglas, Eric Siegel and Victoria Peterson.
Courtesy photos

It’s that time of year: We’re thrilled to welcome three new editorial interns — the first to participate in our newly revised, fully remote coronavirus-era internship program. Look for their work in these pages soon.

Jessica Douglas, who hails from Beaverton, Oregon, is a member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians. Her love for journalism sprouted when she joined the Science & Memory experience at the University of Oregon. The program — which brought together art, climate change and story-telling — was perfect for Jessica, who is also a botany enthusiast and painter. During her time at the university, she interned with the Daily Astorian and Eugene Weekly, and received a degree in journalism with minors in art and Native American studies.

Victoria Peterson was born and, mostly, raised in Anchorage, Alaska. At the University of Alaska Anchorage, she created a hyper-local magazine to report on her home neighborhood. The Spenardian, now in its fourth year, has won several statewide journalism awards. After graduating, Victoria spent two years at a small daily newspaper on the Kenai Peninsula, where she covered fishing, energy, politics and education. Nowadays, she is back in Anchorage, where she tends her small window herb garden. 

Eric Siegel is a lifelong student of literature and observer of landscapes and their politics. In his undergraduate years at the University of Vermont, he majored in geography and English, and also enjoyed a stint as a doctoral student in environmental literature at the University of Iowa. More recently, his inquiries into Western landscapes have led him from freelancing for HCN and teaching environmental ethics to petroleum engineers to researching with the U.S. Forest Service in Montana. 

Readers, we want to hear from you! What were the defining issues for the West in the ’70s? What were you doing? Share your thoughts and photos from the time, and we may publish them here, as we kick off a 50-year HCN retrospective.

Finally, one correction. Due to a typo, our July feature, “Fish Out of Water” stated that scientists know enough to bring the Yaqui catfish back from extinction. In fact, they do not know enough to do this. We regret the error, though perhaps not as much as the catfish do.

High Country News Classifieds