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for people who care about the West

The history of hiking The Continental Divide Trail

Meandering across 3,100 miles, the trail connects Mexico to Canada.

 

The Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail have both become famous in books and film, achieving notoriety as two classic ways to experience the United States on foot. But there is another and less-frequented third path that runs down the spine of the nation and across five states, and, according to Barney Scott Mann, there are many reasons to hike it. In The Continental Divide Trail: Exploring America’s Ridgeline Trail, Mann writes about this less well-known option, a 3,100-mile journey from Mexico to Canada. The book chronicles the first steps of the trailblazers (literally) who envisioned the CDT’s creation and describes the various organizations that have since kept it accessible to the heartiest of hiking enthusiasts. These pages are an ode to the trail’s beauty and travails, its glorious vistas and its history.

The Continental Divide Trail: Exploring America’s Ridgeline Trail
By Barney Scout Mann
288 pages, hardcover: $50.
Rizzoli New York, 2018.