Explore a world of images at Standing Rock

The new book, Standing Strong, shows a spectrum of emotion from #NoDAPL.

  • Matriarch. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Home. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Shadow of a dancer. San Rafael,CA , USA. October, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Canoe ceremony at Oceti Sakowin Camp. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. August, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Man under a teepe near the Dakota Access Pipeline. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Last stand at Oceti Sakowin Camp. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. February, 2017.

    Josué Rivas
  • Resistance. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • An upside down American flag waves at a healing gathering. Fort Yates, North Dakota, USA. September, 2017.

    Josué Rivas
  • A woman walks in the snow during a blizzard. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Police mace Water protectors. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • A group of women carry a wounded warrior. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas
  • Two men get sprayed by law enforcement with high pressure water during a demonstration near the Oceti Sakowin Camp. Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. November, 2016.

    Josué Rivas

 

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe refuses to surrender; earlier this month, the tribe challenged the Army Corps of Engineers’ conclusions that the Dakota Access Pipeline poses no threat to the tribe. The tribe has fought the pipeline for over four years, culminating in headline-making 2016 demonstrations on the reservation in North Dakota. In Standing Strong, Josué Rivas (Mexica/Otomi) looks back at the water protectors and their camps. Rivas mixes moods in black-and-white diptychs, placing a photo of a man holding his eyelids open to be washed after he was sprayed with mace, next to an image of a landscape at dusk. Standing Strong is not merely an account of the protests; rather, it creates an environment of images that linger beyond the book. In the afterword, Ojibwe environmentalist Winona LaDuke writes that the demonstrations opened a “profound moment, when we awaken, look all around and find our people, people of many tribes, colors and histories. We find our power.”

Standing Strong
By Josué Rivas
140 pages, hardcover: $55
FotoEvidence, 2018


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