Wildlife management blossoms on the reservations

 

Note: This article is a sidebar to this issue's feature story.

When the Nez Perce took on the Idaho wolf recovery program, they continued a long tradition of tribal wildlife management.

"We've always managed - we just didn't call it that," says Buzz Cobell, a member of the Blackfeet tribe and a Native American Liaison for the Fish and Wildlife Service. "The only difference is, now we've been acculturated to the point where we approach wildlife management like the federal and state governments do."

Before the U.S. government confined tribes to reservations, some made a living by hunting and fishing selectively, and tribes all over North America used large-scale prescribed burns to improve their hunting grounds. When Western expansion all but destroyed these subsistence livelihoods, most tribes were left with few opportunities for development.

Those dark times were a painful preservative for the 100 million acres of reservation land. "Tribal lands are some of the last undeveloped areas in North America," says Cobell. "The animals are there, and the habitat is in good shape."

For years, it was close to impossible for tribes to get federal money for wildlife management. In 1975, Congress passed the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, which gave tribes more power to choose how they spent federal funds. Later court decisions bolstered tribal control of wildlife on reservation lands, opening the modern era of tribal wildlife management.

Since then, about 70 of the 560 federally recognized tribes have established natural resource programs, ranging from bare-bones inventory and monitoring projects to elaborate fish and wildlife recovery efforts.

  • The Colorado River tribes on the California-Arizona border have created some of the healthiest habitat on the lower Colorado River. In the last five years, they have restored about 400 acres of native cottonwood and willows. The endangered Yuma clapper rail is abundant in the area, and biologists say the restored habitat could provide a home for endangered southwestern willow flycatchers and razorback suckers.
  • The Blackfeet tribe in northwestern Montana has completed three years of a five-year swift fox reintroduction program (HCN, 1/29/01: Swift fox may lose the race). With funding from the national group Defenders of Wildlife, the tribe has so far reintroduced 76 animals, and estimates survival rates as high as 60 percent.
  • In cooperation with several federal and state agencies, the Pyramid Lake Paiutes have helped to recover the endangered cui-ui fish in northwestern Nevada's Pyramid Lake. The terminal lake suffers from upstream diversions, but Congress approved a compromise between irrigators and the tribe in 1990 (HCN, 9/28/98: A senator for the New West in the race of his life). The Paiutes now have the lead role in scheduling water releases from two upstream reservoirs.
  • The Gros Ventre and Assiniboine tribes manage a herd of 600 bison on northeastern Montana's Fort Belknap Reservation. In cooperation with the Fish and Wildlife Service, they have reintroduced endangered black-footed ferrets to the bison range (HCN, 1/15/01: Plains sense) and are working to protect the black-tailed prairie dog.


Some of these projects have allowed tribes to make money off hunting or fishing licenses. Many more have brought back part of traditional tribal livelihoods, and all have restored important pieces of tribal culture.

"You go to the Pine Ridge Reservation and ask who manages wildlife or water quality, and everybody knows," says Pat Durham, the national Native American Liaison for the Fish and Wildlife Service. "That's an important person, someone who affects something that's very important to the tribe."

Funding remains a major roadblock for tribal wildlife projects. Under the Pittman-Robertson Act, taxes on firearms generate millions of dollars for state wildlife departments - but leave tribes out in the cold. Tribes also miss out on federal funds for endangered species management, even though tribal lands are valuable habitat for species in trouble.

"The recovery and protection of dwindling species often ends up in our laps," says Cobell. "The federal and state governments need to reward tribes for the way they've managed the land, not penalize them."

To fill in the funding gaps, some tribes have begun to reach out to nonprofit environmental groups. "We've grown to understand that we must network, we must drop our guards as native peoples," says Levi Holt of the Nez Perce tribe.

Both Defenders of Wildlife and the National Wildlife Federation have been especially active on tribal wildlife projects, and Minette Johnson of Defenders of Wildlife says the cooperative efforts have been a good deal for both sides. "We didn't have to deal with an endless bureaucracy," she says of the swift fox restoration project. "We just did it."

Reservations aren't wildlife preserves, though. As tribes gain economic leverage and political clout, they're unlikely to turn down a chance to build a shopping mall or a new factory on reservation land. "This land was set aside for tribes to manage - and for us to use to care for our people," Cobell points out. "Tribes are carrying the burden of habitat protection that private landowners are reluctant to take on."

High Country News Classifieds
  • 10 ACRES OF NEW MEXICO HIGH DESERT
    10 Acres of undeveloped high desert land in central NM, about 45 minutes from downtown Albuquerque. Mixed cedar and piñon pine cover. Some dirt roadways...
  • WATERSHED RESTORATION DIRECTOR
    $58k-$70k + benefits to oversee watershed restoration projects that fulfill our strategic goals across urban and rural areas within the bi-national Santa Cruz and San...
  • CUSTOMER SERVICE ASSISTANT - (PART-TIME)
    High Country News, an award-winning media organization covering the communities and environment of the Western United States, seeks a part-time Customer Service Assistant, based at...
  • OPERATIONS DIRECTOR
    We are a Santa Fe-based nonprofit that builds resilience on arid working lands. We foster ecological, economic, and social health through education, innovation, and collaboration....
  • COMMUNITY ORGANIZER
    Come work alongside everyday Montanans to project our clean air, water, and build thriving communities! Competitive salary, health insurance, pension, generous vacation time and sabbatical....
  • CAMPAIGN MANAGER
    Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA), a nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to protecting, defending and restoring Oregon's high desert, seeks a Campaign Manager to works as...
  • HECHO DEPUTY DIRECTOR
    Hispanics Enjoying Camping, Hunting, and the Outdoors (HECHO) was created in 2013 to help fulfill our duty to conserve and protect our public lands for...
  • REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE, COLUMBIA CASCADES
    The Regional Representative serves as PCTA's primary staff on the ground along the trail working closely with staff, volunteers, and nonprofit and agency partners. This...
  • FINANCE AND OPERATIONS DIRECTOR
    The Montana Land Reliance (MLR) seeks a full-time Finance and Operations Director to manage the internal functions of MLR and its nonprofit affiliates. Key areas...
  • DIRECTOR OF CONSERVATION
    The Nature Conservancy is recruiting for a Director of Conservation. Provides strategic leadership and support for all of the Conservancy's conservation work in Arizona. The...
  • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
    The Amargosa Conservancy (AC), a conservation nonprofit dedicated to standing up for water and biodiversity in the Death Valley region, seeks an executive director to...
  • BIG BASIN SENIOR PROJECT PLANNER - CLIMATE ADAPTATION & RESILIENCE
    Parks California Big Basin Senior Project Planner - Climate Adaptation & Resilience ORGANIZATION BACKGROUND Parks California is a new organization working to ensure that our...
  • SCIENCE PROJECT MANAGER
    About Long Live the Kings (LLTK) Our mission is to restore wild salmon and steelhead and support sustainable fishing in the Pacific Northwest. Since 1986,...
  • HUMAN RESOURCES GENERALIST
    Honor the Earth is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate based on identity. Indigenous people, people of color, Two-Spirit or LGBTQA+ people,...
  • NEW BOOK BY AWARD-WINNING WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST, BRUCE SMITH
    In a perilous place at the roof of the world, an orphaned mountain goat is rescued from certain death by a mysterious raven.This middle-grade novel,...
  • MOUNTAIN LOTS FOR SALE
    Multiple lots in gated community only 5 miles from Great Sand Dunes National Park. Seasonal flowing streams. Year round road maintenance.
  • RURAL ACREAGE OUTSIDE SILVER CITY, NM
    Country living just minutes from town! 20 acres with great views makes a perfect spot for your custom home. Nice oaks and juniper. Cassie Carver,...
  • A FIVE STAR FOREST SETTING WITH SECLUSION AND SEPARATENESS
    This home is for a discerning buyer in search of a forest setting of premier seclusion & separateness. Surrounded on all sides by USFS land...
  • CARPENTER WANTED
    CARPENTER WANTED. Come to Ketchikan and check out the Rainforest on the coast, HIke the shorelines, hug the big trees, watch deer in the muskeg...
  • CAUCASIAN OVCHARKA PUPPIES
    Strong loyal companions. Ready to protect your family and property. Proven against wolves and grizzlies. Imported bloodlines. Well socialized.