Magazine
High Noon in Washington, D.C.

December 23, 1985

After a year of negotiation between cattle growers, nine national conservation organizations and congressional aides, no compromise was reached on the controversial issue of fees for livestock grazing on public land.

Feature

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High Noon in Washington, D.C.
After a year of negotiation between cattle growers, nine national conservation organizations and congressional aides, no compromise was reached on the controversial issue of fees for livestock grazing on public land.

Perspective

BLM's grazing program is a national scandal
A mere 2 percent of the nation's cattle are consuming the Western public lands that belong to all Americans. So abused are these lands that many millions of acres are only one-tenth as productive as in pre-settlement times.
Wildlife is preyed on by cattle and sheep
The desert grasslands of southern Idaho once supported a vast population of antelope, buffalo, deer, elk, moose, grizzly bear and wolves before settlers moved in during the 1840s. Where is all the wildlife today?
A rancher argues cattle grazing helps everyone
Many people misunderstand the role of the rancher who grazes cattle or sheep on public land.

News

Montana looks askance at a Wyoming project
Wyoming proposes to build a $49 million dam on the Middle Fork of the Powder River. Downstream, Montana agriculturalists who rely heavily on the river for irrigation worry that the dam will cause their already marginal water to deteriorate further.
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