Dear Friends

  • BLAST OF WINTER: This tree survived

    Cindy Wehling photo
  • SHADOW, CABEZA PRIETA: On display in Tucson

    Michael Berman photo
 

First snow

It was like getting hit in the face with a cream pie: A wet snow dumped on much of western Colorado early this month. Trees, still laden with leaves, bent low, some breaking, some perilously stretching power lines, and until the mist cleared, all seemed heavy and ominous. Then the sun chased the foreboding away and also cleared most of the roads. Now we've got that startling contrast back: The temperature drops to 20 degrees or below at night, then zooms up to 50 degrees or more during the day. In a word, it's bracing, or if we're permitted another word, exhilarating.

Vestiges

Scratch a photographer in the West and most often you'll find a passionate defender of wild lands. In Arizona, photographer and High Country News subscriber Michael Berman is no exception, his passion being the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. Agreeing with Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, who said vehicle trails "slice and dice" the refuge, Berman wants wilderness managers to eliminate road tracks and restore the area. You can see Michael Berman's photos of this spectacular sanctuary at his exhibit called "Vestiges: Wilderness in Arizona & New Mexico." It's installed at the Temple Gallery, 330 South Scott Ave., Tucson, Ariz., until Dec. 2 (520/624-7370).

Fall visitors

Brett Greene stopped by after finishing a summer of research at the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab in Gothic, Colo. He got out just before snow closed the road for the winter, he said. He and HCN staffer Michelle Nijhuis were recent classmates at Reed College in Oregon.

Bill Cunningham, a writer in Montrose, Colo., told us about his "Rocky Mountain Tough" series of books, and a couple from Santa Barbara, Calif., Benjamin and Susanne Sawyer, chatted with us about her job at an independent book store that's so successful "people come from out of state to shop there." They were accompanied by their dogs Buddy and Chester, littermates.

We also said quick hellos to Denise Boggs, from Utah's Glen Canyon Institute, Pete Kolbenschlag, director of the Grand Junction office of the Colorado Environmental Coalition, Susan Tixier, state CEC director based in Denver, and Jeff Widen, who represents the coalition in Durango.

Susan Easton and Charlie Fautin, a Laramie, Wyo., couple just back from working for Oxfam United Kingdom in Sri Lanka, informed us they'd regularly received their copies of High Country News abroad, "and even read the paper while sitting beneath a papaya tree."

Marion and Rachel Ross said hello during their mother-daughter road trip from Southborough, Mass., to Santa Cruz, Calif.; and Art Roscoe and Nancy Nightingale told us they'd gotten to know the paper better by listening to reporter Blair Fuelner interview HCN publisher Ed Marston on public radio KPCW, Park City, Utah.

Honored

Feeling a bit like postal workers - "neither rain nor snow nor sleet ..." - representatives of five rural western Colorado organizations journeyed through the first storm of the winter to downtown Denver on Nov. 10, to be honored for their work on some of the West's most intractable problems: grazing, logging, mining and population issues.

The occasion was the Investment in Excellence Dinner put on by the University of Colorado at Denver. The Wirth Chair in Environmental and Community Development Policy, set up to honor former Colorado Sen. Tim Wirth, made the following awards:

High Country News for its reporting on building understanding and consensus concerning sustainability. Board member Dan Luecke and publisher Ed Marston attended the dinner.

The Gunnison Ranchland Conservation Project, which promotes a voluntary, landowner approach to preservation. Susan Lohr attended.

The Western Slope Environmental Resource Council, based in Paonia, which has been working with ranchers to improve grazing in the West Elk Wilderness. Tara Thomas attended the dinner.

The Delta-Montrose Public Lands Partnership, which attempts to build consensus around the idea of using traditional industries to improve and protect ecological systems. Allan and Cathy Belt attended the dinner.

Dr. Richard Grossman of Durango was honored for his efforts to create awareness of the damage population growth causes through his monthly newspaper column in the Durango Herald. Dr. and Mrs. Grossman attended.

"Junkyard dogs"

The High Country Citizens Alliance of Crested Butte, Colo., held its annual dinner on Nov. 5. The outfit is 21 years old, but only this year did the group get around to making its first Junkyard Dog Award. It went to Gunnison County Commissioner Marlene Zanetell, in part because she helped block the paving of Cottonwood Pass (HCN, 12/22/97). She described the citizens of her county as "junkyard dogs' when it comes to defending their land.

* Betsy Marston for the staff

High Country News Classifieds
  • SECLUDED COLORADO HIDEAWAY
    This passive solar home sits on 2 lots and offers an abundance of privacy and views while being only 15 minutes to downtown Buena Vista....
  • COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR
    Introduction: Grand Staircase Escalante Partners (GSEP) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization with offices located in Kanab and Escalante, Utah. We are committed to the conservation...
  • CARETAKER
    2.0 acre homestead needing year-round caretaker in NE Oregon. Contact [email protected] for details.
  • MEMBERSHIP MANAGER
    For more information visit www. wyofile.com/careers/
  • THRIVING LOCAL HEALTH FOOD STORE FOR SALE
    Turn-key business opportunity. Successful well established business with room to grow. Excellent highway visibility.
  • DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR
    For more information, visit www.wyofile.com/careers/
  • STAFF ATTORNEY
    STAFF ATTORNEY POSITION OPENING www.westernlaw.org/about-us/clinic-interns-careers The Western Environmental Law Center (WELC) is a high-impact, nonprofit public interest environmental law firm with a 27-year legacy using...
  • PROJECT MANAGER
    Position Summary Join our Team at the New Mexico Land Conservancy! We're seeking a Project Manager who will work to protect land and water across...
  • SEEKING PROPERTY FOR BISON HERD
    Seeking additional properties for a herd of 1,000 AUM minimum. Interested in partnering with landowners looking to engage in commercial and/or conservation bison ranching. Location...
  • DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT AND MARKETING
    High Country News seeks a Director of Product and Marketing to join our senior team during an exciting chapter of innovation and growth. This individual...
  • WILDLIFE HAVEN
    Beautiful acreage with Teton Creek flowing through it. Springs and ponds, lots of trees, moose and deer. Property has barn. Easy access. approx. 33 acres.
  • ARIZONA CONSERVATION CORPS PROGRAM DIRECTOR
    Arizona Conservation Corps is seeking a Program Director in Flagstaff or Tucson
  • COPPER STAIN: ASARCO'S LEGACY IN EL PASO
    Tales from scores of ex-employees unearth the human costs of an economy that runs on copper.
  • EXPERT LAND STEWART
    Available for site conservator, property manager. View resume at http://skills.ojadigital.net.
  • CONSERVATIONIST? IRRIGABLE LAND?
    Stellar seed-saving NGO is available to serious partner. Package must include financial support. Details: http://seeds.ojaidigital.net.
  • CANYONLANDS FIELD INSTITUTE
    Colorado Plateau Natural & Human History Field Seminars. Lodge, river, hiking options. Small groups, guest experts.
  • WESTERN NATIVE SEED
    Specializing in native seeds and seed mixes for western states.
  • CHUCK BURR'S CULTUREQUAKE.COM BLOG
    Change will happen when we see a new way of living. Thinking to save the world.
  • COMING TO TUCSON?
    Popular vacation house, furnished, 2 bed/1 bath, yard, dog-friendly. Lee at [email protected] or 520-791-9246.
  • OJO CALIENTE COMMERCIAL VENTURE
    Outstanding location near the world famous Ojo Caliente Mineral Spring Resort. Classic adobe Mercantile complete w/living quarters, separate 6 unit B&B, metal building and spacious...