You are here: home   Heard Around the West   The warming properties of greenbacks
  • This article by Betsy Marston originally appeared in the Feb 02, 2012 issue of High Country News.
  • To read the full article, you must login or subscribe.
Please enter your email address to begin:

Continue 
Follow Us
Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
Topic: Culture & Communities     Department: Heard Around the West     Comments: 0

NON-SUBSCRIBER PREVIEW

The warming properties of greenbacks

News: Feb 02, 2012
by Betsy Marston

WASHINGTON
Money may not buy you happiness, but burning it might help keep you from freezing to death. A snowshoer who became lost in a blizzard on Mount Rainier told The Seattle Times that he survived by digging a snow tunnel and then burning everything he could find, from socks and Band-Aids to his toothbrush "and lastly, $1 and $5 bills from his wallet." Yong Chun Kim, 66, an experienced mountaineer, said he became separated from the group he was leading after slipping and then sliding down the mountain. Though he radioed the group that he was OK, he became disoriented in the rough terrain. For two days, Kim, a cancer survivor, kept himself going by praying, eating a little and dreaming of his wife and a warm sauna. He also moved around vigorously and took cover in several deep holes around trees. He tried to keep walking, he recalled, but "the snow was so deep, I couldn't breathe." He found that dollar bills burned the best, though he worried that "in a national park, you're not supposed to have a fire ... but I want to stay alive." It took rescuers nine hours to bring Kim down safely to a visitors' center at 5,400 feet. Afterward, he was in such good shape that he skipped a hospital checkup and went right home to his family.

NORTH DAKOTA
What's risqué in Fargo, N.D.? Flirting. A new ad on the state tourism website featured two young men in a downtown bar smiling out the window at three wholesome young women, one of whom is shyly waving "hi." This is just "sickening," said one critic, though maybe it was the caption he was referring to: "Drinks, dinner, decisions. Arrive a guest. Leave a legend." Another person wondered exactly what you needed to do in order to "leave a legend." Dozens of complaints later, the ad vanished. "It really just takes one or two (negative comments) and then people jump on the bandwagon," said Sara Otte Coleman, director of the state's tourism division. Though a mite cheesy, she said, the ad was merely supposed to convey a sense of fun.

There is 1 more page in this article...

Introductory Offer - Save 20%

Print with digital OR digital only

From our friends

Serious words from a devoted reader:

"I've been a big fan of HCN since a friend first donated a subscription to me...I've received piles of HCN on at least four continents at this point. So, you see, the printed magazine, in the past 20 years, has become part of the warp and weft of my life and I am unwilling to leave it behind..."

Paul Brockmann, constant traveler

Carol Neuhoff is hooked on HCN!

"My brother gave me a gift subscription to your outstanding magazine last Christmas. It's a proud, surprising, eloquent, and pertinent tribute ... every single issue. Thank you for emphasizing the passion for the West over the mere politics. I'm hooked!"

Carol Neuhoff

Quality Reporting is Not Free!

"I subscribed to HCN for a number of years, loved every issue...I stopped subscribing because my work load escalated. It was ok the first few months but after six months I was regretting the decision...the relevance of HCN did not diminish. I continued to look at the enticing titles of articles in the online newsletter but couldn't read enough to satisfy the craving. So I'm back. I also kicked in another 50 bucks as a personal reminder that quality reporting is not free."

Robert E. Hall, Washington D.C.

Email Newsletter

The West in your Inbox

Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! Follow our RSS feeds!
  1. Rancher vs BLM: a 20-year standoff ends with tense roundup |
  2. Photos of a standoff | Armed militia members join a Nevada rancher to pro...
  3. The energy haves and have-nots | Will rooftop solar owners get off the grid — and...
  4. Why homes are lost to wildfire | This Forest Service expert says it's as much a soc...
  5. The future of the Sacramento Delta hangs in the balance | But few Californians seem to grasp what is at stak...
  1. Why homes are lost to wildfire | This Forest Service expert says it's as much a soc...
  2. Photos of a standoff | Armed militia members join a Nevada rancher to pro...
  3. The energy haves and have-nots | Will rooftop solar owners get off the grid — and...
  4. Will the Colorado River reach the Gulf of California once more? | Photographs of last month's historic water pulses....
  5. Locals resist a Bakkenization of the Beartooths | South-central Montanans oppose new drilling, forew...
HCN Classifieds
Subscriber Alert
More from Culture & Communities
International Car Forest of the Last Church For a strange trip, check out Nevada’s otherworldly Stonehenge of wildly painted abandoned vehicles.
Adventure travel vs. conservation A conversation with outdoor entrepreneur Bill Bryan.
The lessons of Ludlow, 100 years later
All Culture & Communities
 
© 2014 High Country News, all rights reserved. | privacy policy | terms of use | powered by Plone