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A goat walks into a bar...

MONTANA

A pygmy goat walks into a bar on a Sunday afternoon -- and no, this isn't the setup to one of those jokes; this really happened in Butte, Mont. The little goat seemed to enjoy the outing until a public-health-conscious patron called the police, who came and took the animal to a shelter. As to how the goat found its way into the bar, the mystery remains. But diligent reporting by the Montana Standard traced the missing goat to a petting zoo based at a nearby hot springs resort, which, despite its many amenities, apparently doesn't serve drinks to goats.

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NEVADA: That about covers it. Courtesy Owen Baughman.

IDAHO

A gun-manufacturing company called III Arms wants to create a brand-new town in rural Idaho for about 7,000 future-fearing "patriotic American families." Apparently, worldwide catastrophe is imminent, so like-minded people ought to clump together. And that, the town's organizers say, means that bearing arms is not a right but a requirement, according to the Huffington Post. All residents 13 years old and older must wear sidearms when visiting the town center, and prospective residents must pay a $208 application fee and sign a "Patriot Agreement," specifying that every adult will own an automatic rifle, 1,000 rounds, and a survival stockpile for when the outside world erupts in chaos. An artist's conception of the Citadel shows a double-walled town, a new III Arms factory (the primary employer), and a firearms museum with reflecting pool, along with a farmers market, homes and schools. Organizers, who insist that they are not "wackos, cultists or racists," also plan to create a bank and issue Citadel coins in silver and gold. So far, more than 200 people have signed up.

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