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  • Handling griz: How much is enough?

    Increasing numbers of the West’s grizzly bears wear radio collars, and some environmentalists question the necessity of the practice

  • Pombo takes on the Endangered Species Act

    On his 12th attempt, Rep. Richard Pombo, R-Calif., succeeds in pushing a bill through the U.S. House designed to reform the Endangered Species Act and end critical habitat protection

  • Super-sized dam could be a cash register for California farmers

    The Bureau of Reclamation has agreed to deliver more water to California’s Central Valley Project than it actually has, and is considering raising Shasta Dam to provide it

  • Industry walks a fuzzy line between preservation and extortion

    EnCana Oil and Gas offers to pay for offsite mitigation in Wyoming in exchange for intensive drilling rights in the Jonah Field

  • As Washington waffles, Western states go green

    Western state legislatures boost wildlife and green energy, even as Washington, D.C., remains hooked on fossil fuels

  • BLM gags an archaeologist to get out the gas

    BLM archaeologist Blaine Miller says that a slew of new oil and gas projects could harm spectacular Indian rock art and ruins in Utah’s Nine Mile Canyon

  • Would quotas save the seas, or just big business

    Some fishermen fear that individual fishing quotas are likely to enrich corporations at the expense of small fishermen, while doing little to help the oceans

  • The push is on to privatize federal jobs

    The Bush administration has ordered federal land-management agencies to identify jobs that might be performed more cheaply by the private sector.

  • Montana tribes drive the road to sovereignty

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes fight a plan to four-lane Highway 93 through Montana's Flathead Reservation, winning a new highway plan with tough protections for wildlife, safety and cultural resources.

  • An environmentalist in the heart of cowboy culture

    Former Interior Secretary Stewart Udall, Arizona native, rancher and environmentalist, lectures on cooperation and community in the West at the Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nev., and gets a surprising ovation.

  • Follow-up

    Judge rules citizens can petition to have "candidate" species listed as endangered; genetically engineered salmon eat regular salmon; genetically engineered corn planted in Colorado; Energy Department plans to ship weapons grade plutonium and enriched ura

  • Buying time against the energy assault

    Bidding on oil and gas leases for conservation purposes in places like Delta County, Colo., could prove to be a risky strategy, some environmentalists warn

  • Greenhouse gases go underground

    Plans for permanently storing carbon dioxide in oil fields will benefit energy companies who already use carbon dioxide injection to boost output.

  • Wildlife win one in Yellowstone

    The National Wildlife Federation negotiates two important land deals with ranchers in the Yellowstone area, ending grazing on Horse Butte and protecting local bison

  • Clean water changes could sully Western streambeds

    If the Bush administration pushes through a rule change to the Clean Water Act, three-fourths of the West’s rivers would be unprotected from pollution

  • Taos' return to the acequias

    38 years of meetings and a price-tag of $120 million formalize old agreements

  • The green Republican: back from the dead?

    Worried about falling poll numbers, some Republicans, led by Sen. Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, are resisting some of the Bush administration’s more far-reaching attacks on environmental protection

  • States crack down on illegal immigrants

    With Congress stalled on immigration reform, Western states such as Colorado are tackling the issue with tough new laws

  • Anti-government attack has many fronts

    Across the West, anti-government activists from out of state are funding ballot measures that attack government spending and the judiciary as well as land-use planning

  • When can the BLM say 'no'?

    BLM and Forest Service officials say they have little power to prevent drilling in an area once it’s been OK’d for leasing, but critics say the government simply refuses to use its power

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