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  • On the road, and on a date with history

    In Uncertain Pilgrims, novelist Lenore Carroll follows a troubled young woman who is retracing the Santa Fe Trail

  • A forest in flux

    Jon R. Luoma examines old-growth forests through the eyes of the scientists who study them in The Hidden Forest: The Biography of an Ecosystem

  • The great American road trip

    In At Speed: Traveling the Long Road Between Two Points, W. Scott Olsen celebrates the world as seen through a windshield

  • Big dams, big deal

    Big Dams of the New Deal Era: A Confluence of Engineering and Politics is as deep and erudite a tome as it sounds, and yet also a surprisingly good read

  • Western open space: Land of intrinsic worth

    In the anthology Home Land: Ranching and a West That Works, a wide variety of authors argue that ranching is much more than an outmoded “lifestyle.”

  • Impressions of Pueblo prehistory

    Craig Childs’ new book House of Rain is less an in-depth look at Southwestern archaeology than one person’s attempt to appreciate a part of the world

  • Longing for a buried past

    Rick Bass’ new short story collection, The Lives of Rocks, proves that his fierce environmental activism has not diminished the intensity of his storytelling genius

  • A poet’s novel of the San Luis Valley

    In Rise, Do Not Be Afraid, poet Aaron Abeyta explores the lives of the people who lived and loved in the long-lost town of Santa Rita in Colorado’s remote San Luis Valley

  • British writer tackles border politics

    British author Bella Pollen’s new novel, Midnight Cactus, looks at Arizona’s border issues through the eyes of an upper-class English newcomer who has left her executive husband and sought refuge in a ghost town.

  • Tipping the scales towards native species

    In Unnatural Landscapes, Ceiridwin Terrill travels to four arid sites to show how scientists fight to protect indigenous organisms from invasive species

  • A brief, interpretive look at the Indian Wars

    Michael Blake’s new nonfiction book, Indian Yell, fails to live up to its ambitious subtitle, “The Heart of an American Insurgency,” with its quick tour of 12 battles between the U.S. Cavalry and American Indians.

  • The granddaddy of all collaboration groups

    In his beautiful, compact book Working Wilderness, Nathan Sayres tells the story of the Malpai Borderlands Group, “the most hailed example of collaborative place-based resource management in the West.”

  • The Hayduke Trail: A Guide to the Backcountry Hiking Trail on the Colorado Plateau

    In The Hayduke Trail, Joe Mitchell and Mike Coronella give you all the information – and motivation – you’ll need to set off on foot into the Canyon Country

  • Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border: Film, Music andStories of Undocumented Immigrants

    In Alambrista and the U.S.-Mexico Border, editors Nicholas J. Cull and David Carrasco describe the making of the 1977 movie Alambrista, which explored the lives of undocumented migrant workers

  • The Guymas Chronicles

    The Guaymas Chronicles by archaeologist David E. Stuart is a funny and touching memoir of the time he spent in Mexico in the early 1970s

  • More than numbers: The dead of Idaho's Sunshine Mine

    In The Deep Dark, Gregg Olsen tells the tragic story of the 1972 fire in the Sunshine Mine in Idaho’s Silver Valley, which took the lives of 91 men

  • Finding good grub in Mormon redrock country

    In With a Measure of Grace: The Story and Recipes of a Small Town Restaurant, Blake Spalding and Jennifer Castle tell how they ended up running the Hell’s Backbone Grill in the remote community of Boulder, Utah

  • A geography of the imagination

    In Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, edited by Barry Lopez and Debra Gwartney, 45 diverse writers define unusual geographical terms used across the country.

  • Native Waters

    In Native Waters: Contemporary Indian Water Settlements and the Second Treaty Era, scholar Daniel McCool explores the current struggle by tribes to finally get the water they have long been promised by treaty.

  • Cowgirl meets lawsuit

    In her first novel, Jackalope Dreams, Western writer Mary Clearman Blew gives us a tale of the contemporary West that rings both sad and true.

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