California’s Camp Fire, in photos

As of Nov. 13, the disaster has claimed 42 lives as the search for missing people continues.

  • A health care facility in Paradise, California, is consumed by flames from the Camp Fire.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • Firefighters try to keep flames from a home from spreading to a neighboring apartment complex as they battle the Camp Fire.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • Smoke rises next to a power line tower in Big Bend, California, after the Camp Fire moved through the area.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • The Camp Fire rips through Paradise. It quickly charred 18,000 acres and destroyed dozens of homes in a matter of hours.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • A bulldozer operator cuts a fire break west of Paradise.

    Digital First Media/The Mercury News via Getty Images
  • While evacuating patients, employees at the Feather River Hospital work in a triage area in Paradise.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • Traffic builds as people evacuate from the Camp Fire.

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
  • NASA satellite images show smoke engulfing the San Francisco Bay Area.

    Stuart Rankin/Flickr CC
  • Smoke from wildfires obscures the San Francisco skyline behind the Golden Gate Bridge on Nov. 9.

    Eric Risberg/AP Images
  • A decimated neighborhood of Pentz Road in Paradise on Nov. 11. As of Monday, Nov. 12, the death toll was 29 people.

    Mason Trinca for The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • Steven P. Lobdell, a resident of Paradise, California, places American flags along his neighbors' sidewalks on Nov. 11.

    Mason Trinca for The Washington Post via Getty Images

 

The Camp Fire, located in Northern California, has become one of the state’s most destructive fires to-date. According to Monday’s numbers, the fire has killed 29 people either in their homes or while trying to evacuate, while hundreds of thousands of residents have been displaced. The death toll is expected to rise as crews begin to search for the missing. As of Monday afternoon, the fire was just 25 percent contained and had destroyed more than 6,000 structures, according to the San Francisco Chronicle’s fire tracker map. In southern California, the Woolsey Fire has resulted in two other fatalities, and burned 91,571 acres — that fire is 20 percent contained. As climate change intensifies in the coming years, the likelihood of these types of catastrophes are expected to increase.