No more gold giveaways on our public lands

 

Since 1872, mining interests have made billions of dollars by removing and selling valuable minerals from our public lands without having to pay a cent to the American taxpayer. This is one of the biggest budget loopholes of the modern economy, and it needs to change -- especially now -- as Congress tries to address the deficit and balance budgets.

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Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva

Blame this bizarre omission of royalties on the 1872 Mining Law, which encouraged Westward expansion by allowing prospectors to stake claims on public lands and freely remove “hardrock” minerals like gold, silver, copper and uranium. This saloon-era handout -established over 140 years ago -- continues unchanged to this day. Mining companies still receive these precious metals and minerals for free.

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Sen. Tom Udall

Today, some of the world’s biggest companies make a mint by mining our metals, selling them to the highest bidder, keeping all the profits and often sticking taxpayers with a costly cleanup bill. We’re left with a legacy of abandoned and contaminated mines on public lands that leak into streams and aquifers, lands that should be managed for the benefit of the American people.

Even as these giveaways continue, funding for national parks and other public facilities keep getting tighter. Employees’ hours are being reduced, cleanup crews are scarce, and trails are going untended and falling into ruin. Even a small royalty could rejuvenate our public-lands system, help clean up abandoned mines and mine waste, and put people back to work. Why should companies get a free ride while the national budget is slashed and parks close for lack of funds? With prices for gold, silver and other minerals at near-record highs, requiring companies to pay a royalty for public resources is simply good policy.

In 2011, we requested a Government Accountability Office investigation of this issue. The results, published this past November, were striking: The GAO found that we have no estimate at all of the value of the hardrock resources extracted from federal property. Not only are we giving public resources away for free, we don’t even know what’s being taken or the value of what we’re giving away.

Chris Horquilla
Chris Horquilla
Mar 12, 2013 07:02 PM
Royalty provisions contained within legislation recently considered before U.S. Congress were considerably higher than those, which have been historically paid by the hard rock mining industry and are also structured in such a way that it would make many mining operations unprofitable.

The mining industry does support the imposition of a net profits royalty on mineral production, which would be in line with royalties that have been historically paid by the mining industry.