Water

Flash flood chaser
Flash flood chaser
One man’s obsession improves forecasting in southern Utah.
Don’t drink the water
Don’t drink the water
Portland’s fluoridation battle shows how tricky it is to integrate science into debates that have as much to do with values as policy.
Watershed moment
Watershed moment
The U.S. and Canada prepare to renegotiate the 50-year-old Columbia River Treaty.
A river divided
The 670 miles of the Yellowstone River cross a varied landscape and face an equal variety of problems along the way.
An opportunity lost to politics
Landowner opposition helped shoot down President Clinton's Heritage Rivers Initiative, which Yellowstone River activists believe could have helped the river greatly.
Property owners call the shots
The unregulated development of private property along the banks of the Yellowstone River is the greatest threat to the river.
A family encounters a conservation quandary
Andrew Dana, who went to the Army Corps of Engineers for a permit to stabilize the Yellowstone River's banks on his land, describes the permitting process as "a bad dream."
The last wild river
The Yellowstone River is the longest undammed river in the West, but Montana's rapid growth is affecting it, as property owners afraid of floods lay huge amounts of riprap along its banks.
A dam good speech
Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber becomes the first major political figure in the Northwest to back breaching of four Snake River dams to help endangered salmon.
Drain it now, says organization
The Glen Canyon Action Network plans a Restoration Celebration and Rendezvous at Utah's Glen Canyon Dam.
To breach or not to breach
Both sides are surprised when dam-breaching supporters outnumber opponents at public meetings over breaching four Snake River dams to save salmon.
A pilot's-eye view of the West
Michael Collier's new book, "Water, Earth and Sky: The Colorado River Basin," combines his beautiful aerial photos of a remarkable landscape with well-chosen words.
More drains for pothole country?
The Natural Resource Conservation Service wants to identify South Dakota wetlands by a September fly-over, but environmentalists say the timing of the survey will leave out wetlands not visible from the air at that dry time of year.