Water

Lake Mead watch: As levels fall, hydropower dips
Lake Mead watch: As levels fall, hydropower dips
Why Southwest utilities are starting to sweat.
Latest: Clean Water Act to protect more waterways
Latest: Clean Water Act to protect more waterways
After years of confusion over which waters are protected by the EPA, Waters of the US rule is updated.
Grand Canyon floods are rebuilding sandbars
Grand Canyon floods are rebuilding sandbars
But there are limits to what can be done to tweak dam management to benefit ecosystems.
In Iraq, there’s hope of restoring the Garden of Eden
Iraq has a chance to restore its fabled Mesapotamia Marshes, just as America could revive its own Colorado River Delta
With its back to the wall, California turns to the sea
Matt Jenkins says California spies drinking water when it looks at the Pacific
The Colorado River’s sleeping giant stirs
The Navajo Nation wants to start receiving its long-withheld share of the Colorado River’s water
Water principles of the West begin with blaming California
Colorado’s nice-sounding new "water principles" ignore the traditional, real principles that have long defined water rights – and the fight over them – in the region
Cold War toxin seeps into Western water
Ammonium perchlorate, a toxic ingredient in rocket fuel, has appeared in Nevada’s Lake Mead as well as in other Western water sources used for drinking and irrigation
New Mexico’s new governor must reckon with history
Probably no other Western state is as deeply fractured as New Mexico, with its complex mix of Indian, Hispanic and Anglo cultures and their long, turbulent history
Indian Power
Fueled by money from casino gambling, New Mexico’s Indian pueblos and reservations are throwing their political weight into the state’s water tug-of-war
On the WaterWatch
WaterWatch of Oregon has a newly revamped Web site designed to educate people about the Beaver State’s rivers and watersheds.
Dredging plans stall on the Snake River
A controversial plan to dredge the Snake River west of Lewiston, Idaho, has been stalled by a judge – for now
Water face-off in Fresno
Fresno, Calif., is fighting a federal ultimatum that would make the city bill residents based on how much water they use
Water principles of the West begin with blaming California
Writer offers rules for water management, and the first rule is: Always blame California.
Lake Powell: Going, going, gone?
Lake Powell is drying up in the drought, a reminder from nature that human beings are not in control, after all.
Memories of a native river
In Native River, William D. Layman uses words and photographs to explore an earlier era of the Columbia River, before it was tamed and transformed by dams
It’s time for a new law of the river
The writer says California’s agricultural elite is holding on to Colorado River water that could better serve the region’s growing cities.
Removing Dams – Rebuilding Rivers
The history and impacts of dam removal are considered in Watershed: The Undamming of America by Elizabeth Grossman and Dam Removal: Science and Decision Making by the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment
The West’s cities should trump agriculture
California’s agricultural elite is holding onto water that could better serve the state’s cities
California’s water binge skids to a halt
At midnight on New Year’s Eve, Interior Secretary Gale Norton astonished California by it cutting off from the "surplus" Colorado River water it has long been using, after the state failed to come up with promised water transfers.
How to go with the flow
Montana Audubon has written an eight-page guide to flood preparation, called Go With the Flow: Streams and Bank Stabilization.
Fish and wildlife have rights, too
Montana’s Supreme Court rules that citizens and government agencies can maintain water rights without "using" the water, while the Wyoming Legislature stalls over a bill that would allow irrigators to leave water instream temporarily.
Klamath water worth more in river
A U.S. Geological Survey study, suppressed by the Interior Department in October, says that recreation adds more than agriculture to the economy of the Klamath River Basin.