Water

Colorado’s river economy worth $9 billion
Colorado’s river economy worth $9 billion
Outdoor recreation businesses say state water plan must do more to protect rivers.
More pesticides are permeating urban streams
More pesticides are permeating urban streams
But rural rivers are getting cleaner, a new study says.
Diversion plans for the Gila would have major impact, critics say
Diversion plans for the Gila would have major impact, critics say
Small and medium-sized flows could be most affected.
Dam busters win symbolic victory
California anvironmentalists are pleased that the Bureau of Reclamation has given up on completing the planned Auburn Dam for the Middle Fork of the American River.
A flood of admirers
In the anthology The River We Carry With Us, writers and poets celebrate the enduring beauty of Montana's Clark Fork River and grapple with the environmental problems facing it.
A dry old time
The Quivira Coalition is offering a workshop in low-tech river restoration methods on the Dry Cimarron River in northeastern New Mexico.
Delta Blues
CALFED, a huge Clinton-era project designed to restore the California Delta, now seems to be stalled and unraveling under an indifferent Bush administration.
Drought unearths a water dinosaur
"The Big Straw" - a massive, extravagant scheme to bring water from Colorado's Western Slope to its crowded Front Range, is being seriously reconsidered in a state faced with drought and a growing population.
The Royal Squeeze
California's Imperial Valley is under pressure to reduce the amount of Colorado River water it uses for irrigation, but some fear changes could inadvertently dry up the Salton Sea, imperiling birds and animals that depend on it.
River's end
The Culminating Conference for the year-long series, Moving Waters: The Colorado River and the West, is set for four days in September in Flagstaff, Ariz.
EPA puts cleanup in local hands
The planned Superfund cleanup of Idaho's Lake Coeur d'Alene is taken from the EPA and given to a controversial new local commission, although the Coeur d'Alene Tribe says it will force the EPA to take back the project, if necessary.
The sod squad wants to soak you
In the drought-stricken West, water cops, singing governors and giant walking raindrops are just some of the odd measures spawned by water-conservation campaigns.
Can the tide turn for Walker Lake?
As Nevada's Walker Lake gets smaller and saltier, the Paiute tribe, local farmers and the BLM wrestle over water rights and wonder how to keep the threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout alive without destroying the area's economy.