Can herbicides keep Tahoe blue?
Can herbicides keep Tahoe blue?
A new chemical weed management plan has the lake’s water suppliers nervous.
Anatomy of a flash flood
Anatomy of a flash flood
After a series of deaths, a writer considers his own close calls in canyons.
Does optimism have a place in Western water politics?
Does optimism have a place in Western water politics?
Writer John Fleck wants us to abandon our dried-up narratives of doom.
Pueblo water battle nears its end
If New Mexico’s 40-year-old Aamodt case is settled, it will end centuries of wrangling over water use, but not everybody is happy with how it’s ending
Getting out of the office, and into hot water
California geology professor Jeff Mount uses river trips as an educational tool
One dam down; four in limbo
Oregon’s Chiloquin dam to come down
How to save a creek... one drop at a time
A detailed map shows the work being done on Oregon’s Whychus Creek to restore instream flows with the cooperation of local farmers
Good work in Washington
The Bush administration deserves credit for its "Water 2025" initiative, which provided grants that have helped the Deschutes River Conservancy and the Central Oregon Irrigation District begin restoring Oregon’s Deschutes River
A River Once More
In Oregon, a revolutionary community alliance is working to put water – and steelhead trout – back into the Deschutes River
Several magazines and newspapers provide good independent commentary on water in the West, but there is always room for more
The wet Net
John Orr created his "Coyote Gulch" blog to follow Denver-area politics and Colorado water issues
Rick Spilsbury, a Western Shoshone Indian, writes bitingly and sometimes hilariously about Nevada’s water issues on his "noshootfoot" blog
Running on empty in Sin City
Although many rural Nevadans are unhappy with Las Vegas’ plans for a giant groundwater project, the six other states that rely on water from the Colorado River are hoping the Nevada project goes ahead.
In a dark, narrow storm drain below the border town of Douglas, Ariz., eight illegal immigrants drowned in the summer of 1997
The anatomy of an energy lease
The BLM’s decision to lease land for energy exploration in the watersheds of Grand Junction and Palisade, Colo., reveals the way oil and gas leasing works
For the love of a river
In the anthology There’s This River, Christa Sadler gathers the stories of rambunctious river rafters on the Grand Canyon’s Colorado River
Nine reasons why a river is good for the soul
A writer on a river trip through canyon country muses on things like sand, rapids, ruins and time, as well as the joy that comes from being outside in the company of family and friends
Xeric Families of the West
Photo descriptions of Xeriscapers in the West
What is Xeriscaping?
The seven basic principles of Xeriscaping are explained
Have golf's glory days gone by?
Golf – the game that brought grass to the desert – appears to have hit a rough patch in the West
A green obsession
Westerners, like most Americans, are deeply in love with their lawns – but in an time of increasing drought, the Kentucky bluegrass is going to have to go
The Lure of the Lawn
It’s not easy to wean Westerners away from their lush, traditional, turfgrass lawns, but with drought an increasing fact of life, Xeriscape gardening is finally catching on
Lake Powell gets an A for boating and a D for water storage
The writer visits half-full Lake Powell and finds a message for the West