Can herbicides keep Tahoe blue?
Can herbicides keep Tahoe blue?
A new chemical weed management plan has the lake’s water suppliers nervous.
Anatomy of a flash flood
Anatomy of a flash flood
After a series of deaths, a writer considers his own close calls in canyons.
Does optimism have a place in Western water politics?
Does optimism have a place in Western water politics?
Writer John Fleck wants us to abandon our dried-up narratives of doom.
Harvesting the sky
Thirsty Santa Fe, N.M., considers an innovative law requiring all new buildings to install rainwater-harvesting systems.
The Gila's Monster
Along the upper Gila in New Mexico, conservationists and the state squabble over managing the river's water.
Elwha River dams move closer to destruction
Two massive dams on Washington's Elwha River will be demolished to restore salmon runs.
Stream leases languish
Efforts to privatize instream-flow protection – to keep enough water in rivers and streams to sustain their ecological functions – face tough going in the West.
Don’t move a mussel
Boaters, kayakers, anglers and other recreationists can help stop the spread of quagga mussels and other aquatic invasives by following a few simple rules.
New Mexico’s water rebel
Albuquerque water developer Bill Turner, a board member of the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District, is often described as the bane of the district as well.
Against the current
For a long time, the West used water as if the supply were endless, but nowadays environmentalists are finding that too much efficiency causes problems of its own, especially in fragile ecosystems like the Colorado River Delta.
The Efficiency Paradox
Water efficiency has long been touted as a silver bullet for the West’s water problems, but too much efficiency can cause problems of its own, especially in the fragile Colorado River Delta.
Schooling, fish
Judge Jim Redden is right to push the Bush administration on salmon restoration, but fish may end up faring as poorly in courtrooms as San Francisco’s schoolchildren did after well-intentioned decisions on busing.
History of a decline
An illustrated timeline charts the appearance of dams on the lower Snake River and the resulting decline of salmon, along with the so-far-inadequate response of the federal government.
Salmon Justice
Judge Jim Redden has given the Bush administration an ultimatum: Submit a viable plan for salmon restoration, or face the possible removal of four dams on the lower Snake River.
River Redux
Six decades after Friant Dam killed off the San Joaquin River’s spring-run chinook, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Friant Water Users Authority are working with the federal government to restore both the fish and the river
Somewhere up the crazy river
In Upstream: Sons, Fathers, and Rivers, Robin Carey recounts a kayak journey up the Klamath River that he made with his son, Dev, and on the way explores the Careys’ troubled family history
An encyclopedia of rivers
The huge, copiously illustrated Rivers of North America is the first comprehensive effort to detail the current state of the continent’s rivers
A Utah resort town welcomes 300,000 foreigners
The writer has high hopes for a beetle from Kazakhstan that devours invasive tamarisk trees
Pueblo water battle nears its end
If New Mexico’s 40-year-old Aamodt case is settled, it will end centuries of wrangling over water use, but not everybody is happy with how it’s ending
Getting out of the office, and into hot water
California geology professor Jeff Mount uses river trips as an educational tool
One dam down; four in limbo
Oregon’s Chiloquin dam to come down
How to save a creek... one drop at a time
A detailed map shows the work being done on Oregon’s Whychus Creek to restore instream flows with the cooperation of local farmers
Good work in Washington
The Bush administration deserves credit for its "Water 2025" initiative, which provided grants that have helped the Deschutes River Conservancy and the Central Oregon Irrigation District begin restoring Oregon’s Deschutes River