Recreation

Hunters and anglers organize against land transfers
Hunters and anglers organize against land transfers
Sixty-nine percent of hunters in the 11 Western states rely on public lands for the sport.
After a ski patroller’s death, a flurry of questions
After a ski patroller’s death, a flurry of questions
Forest Service permitting issues complicate a southwestern Colorado tragedy
Six decades of river exploration
Six decades of river exploration
Review of “Downstream Toward Home” by Oliver A. Houck.
Four-ton bandage applied to trampled peak
Forest Service employee Loretta McEllhiney finds creative ways to restore heavily trampled and eroded hiking trails on Colorado's Mt. Elbert.
Falling arches
Tourists Jim and Dafang Lin witness a 44-foot slab fall from Utah's 306-ft. Landscape Arch.
Xerox copiers and black helicopters
A tongue-in-cheek consideration of Colorado Republican Scott McInnis' search for waste at the Department of Interior, the closing of national parks and the Christian Coalition's involvement in both.
Ski resort flops in midst of land boom
A controversial Colorado proposed ski resort, Lake Catamount, suffers a setback when the major investor pulls out.
Learning the trick of quiet
The writer muses about loving and protecting the landscape of one's own backyard.
Moab area acts to regain control of public lands
Changes in management of Moab-area public lands, including new visitor fees, may help protect an over-used landscape.
Ranchers charge tourists for a dose of reality
"Recreational ranchers" earn extra money from tourists who pay for a chance to work as cowboys.
Seeking power, a few ski workers go union
In a few resorts, beleagured ski workers are turning to unions for help.
He came to ski and stayed to help
J. Francis Stafford, the Archbishop of Denver, makes socioeconomic justice and worker's problems in ski country a priority.
It always comes down to finding a place to live
Creating low-cost housing in ski country involves overcoming a variety of hurdles.