Recreation

KDNK Radio speaks with HCN reporter Sarah Tory
KDNK Radio speaks with HCN reporter Sarah Tory
A battle over illegal bike trails in Sedona raises tough questions about soaring recreation use on public lands.
Whitewater parks: an unlikely drought bailout
Whitewater parks: an unlikely drought bailout
Expensive artificial wave features can ease dry times for river economies.
Public-lands visitation and recreation, by the numbers
Public-lands visitation and recreation, by the numbers
Fatalities, backcountry trips, ATVs and Denali summit attempts over the years.
Snowmobiles remain an issue
Snowmobilers and the tourist industry object to the Park Service's plan to close some Yellowstone trails to snowmobiling in an effort to curb the winter wandering of park bison.
Microbes for sale here
Yellowstone Park officials sign a contract that formally opens the park's hot springs to "bioprospecting," allowing the San Diego company, Diversa Corp., to collect samples of hot-water microbes called thermophiles.
Politics tangles with science
In their own words, ecologist Charles Kay denounces Yellowstone's policy of "natural regulation," while ecologist Mark Boyce defends it.
One scientist's forbidden fruit
Scientist Richard Keigley studies Yellowstone's trees to back up his contention that the park's elk herds are out of control and need regulation.
Is nature running too wild in Yellowstone?
Maverick ecologist Richard Keigley believes Yellowstone's policy of "natural regulation" is not working and, in fact, is harming the park - especially with the park's elk herds, which he says are overgrazing their ranges.
Bigger might be better for Utah's parks
In Utah, Canyonlands park officials and conservationists are saying that an area slated for oil drilling, Lockhart Basin, which is right outside the park boundaries, should be included in the park and protected.
Yellowstone at 125: The park as a sovereign state
As Yellowstone National Park celebrates its 125th birthday, it continues to struggle with the surrounding states over wildlife management and other questions.
Close those roads
Environmentalists want to close some backcountry roads near Paonia, Colo., that are increasingly popular with all-terrain vehicles.
Utah's bumbling obscures a valid complaint
The Utah congressional delegation's continued attacks on President Clinton only serve to confuse the real issues raised by the president's declaration of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.
Bear myths
Book review of Dave Smith's "Backcountry Bear Basics: The Definitive Guide to Avoiding Unpleasant Encounters."
Cold weather crowds
A report by the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee, "Winter Visitor Use Management," discusses the threats to the park brought on by recent, greatly increased winter visitation.
A do-over in Telluride
The Forest Service revises its approval of a ski area expansion onto public land in Telluride, Colo.
'Thrillcraft' leave a polluted, contentious wake
Across the country, conservationists battle the rapidly growing use of noisy, motorized water "thrillcraft," such as jet skis and power boats.
A Colorado reality check: lions roam and kill
In separate attacks by mountain lions, a boy in Colorado's Mesa Verde National Park is wounded, and another boy, in Rocky Mountain National Park, is killed.
No parking in the parks
"Consumer Reports" rates its subscribers' experiences in American national parks and finds many complaints about parking, bad roads and overcrowding.
Bills target Antiquities Act
Utah lawmakers try to push bills thgrough Congress to limit the Antiquities Act and control management of the new Grand Staircase-Escalante Nat'l Monument created with the Antiquities Act.
Darkness un-Vailed
Vail Associates' plans for night skiing on Colorado's Vail Mountain are withdrawn after locals protest.
Proposed ski resort does a face plant
After a 25-year battle, developer Fred Kummer gives up his plan for the Adam's Rib Ski Resort in Colorado's Eagle County.
The slaughter of bison reopens old wounds
Rosalie Little Thunder was arrested for physically confronting the bison slaughter outside Yellowstone, while other Native Americans, equally concerned, propose to re-establish bison herds on reservation land, using otherwise doomed animals.
Will the bison killing resume next winter?
After half of Yellowstone's bison were slaughtered in Montana last winter over fears of brucellosis disease, the debate remains unresolved and the killing could easily continue next year.