Recreation

Hunters and anglers organize against land transfers
Hunters and anglers organize against land transfers
Sixty-nine percent of hunters in the 11 Western states rely on public lands for the sport.
After a ski patroller’s death, a flurry of questions
After a ski patroller’s death, a flurry of questions
Forest Service permitting issues complicate a southwestern Colorado tragedy
Six decades of river exploration
Six decades of river exploration
Review of “Downstream Toward Home” by Oliver A. Houck.
Cars and wilderness collide on a rim
Some want to open the last 12 unroaded miles of Oregon's Hells Canyon western rim to vehicles.
Yellowstone's "geyser guy' was one of the park's best friends
An elegy for Yellowstone's "geyser guy," Rick Hutchinson, profiles a geologist who loved the park so deeply that his friends still feel his spirit there.
Planes beat out quiet
The federal Aviation Administration bows to the protests of air tour operators, and delays setting up new flight-free zones over Grand Canyon until next year.
Chet Huntley's legacy includes suppression of a free press
The preferential treatment Big Sky gives the pro-resort Lone Peak Lookout over the independent Big Sky Bugle is an ironic legacy for a hard-hitting journalist like Chet Huntley to leave.
Armies of skiers are coming to Yellowstone
Seven ski resorts ring Yellowstone National Park and add to the pressure on a fragile ecosystem.
Touring the future on Insta-Teller Road
A computerized key-pad locked road in Big Sky epitomizes a ski resort where the "haves" are carefully kept from the trespassing "have nots."
How Huntley sold Big Sky to Montana
Big Sky founding father and famous TV newsman Chet Huntley started the resort but did not live to see what he created.
Big Sky above, private land below
Former Big Sky ski patrolman J.C. Knaub in his own words describes the difficulties faced in trying to bring neighborhood parks and trails to Big Sky.
Big Sky, big mess in Montana
A Montana ski resort originally created by newsman Chet Huntley and intended to be a model of free-market, unconstrained development, is today a morass of lawsuits, environmental degradation and inefficiency.
Ski resort beefs up
Reaction is mixed to the Forest Service's decision to not allow development on Oregon's Mount Hood to expand onto more public land - but allow 5,000 more skiers, six new chairlifts and a new restaurant on the slopes.