Recreation

National parks ponder fee increases
National parks ponder fee increases
Entrance fees haven't gone up since 2008.
A new century with carnivores
A new century with carnivores
Learning to see predators as companions, not competition.
When is lightning likely?
When is lightning likely?
The National Weather Service’s new lightning potential index.
Big Sky, big mess in Montana
A Montana ski resort originally created by newsman Chet Huntley and intended to be a model of free-market, unconstrained development, is today a morass of lawsuits, environmental degradation and inefficiency.
Ski resort beefs up
Reaction is mixed to the Forest Service's decision to not allow development on Oregon's Mount Hood to expand onto more public land - but allow 5,000 more skiers, six new chairlifts and a new restaurant on the slopes.
Green groups stick to their guns
A Park Service decision to shoot introduced mountain goats that are endangering plants in the Olympic Mountains receives support from some environmental groups, although many problems remain.
Is there oil under Utah's new monument?
Conoco wants to drill one or two exploratory oil wells in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument before its leases expire in November.
'I kill them and cook them'
In his own words, Mac Carelli, owner of C&C Meats in Sheridan, Wyo., describes how he deals with bison carcasses.
When parks close, towns lose
A report by the National Parks and Conservation Association says that gateway communities suffered big economic losses when national parks closed during the 1996 government shutdown.
Boats may get bounced
Jet skiers and those who rent and sell machines to them are irate over a possible ban of the noisy watercraft from Lake Tahoe.
Utahns fight over flights
A Utah County's decision to permit helicopter skiing on a private ranch raises opposition from residents and backcountry skiers.
To the south, bison and cattle coexist
While the Yellowstone bison are slaughtered , south of the park near Grand Teton National Park, cattle have grazed next to brucellosis-infected bison and elk for 75 years with no problems.
'Humane is what's best for humans'
Yellowstone National Park photographer Jim Peaco, in his own words, on the bison slaughter.