Recreation

Animas dispatch: Hundreds celebrate the river’s reopening
Animas dispatch: Hundreds celebrate the river’s reopening
Durango may be moving on, but wider fears about the toxic spill still reverberate.
Marijuana in Washington: The long road to legalization
Marijuana in Washington: The long road to legalization
Over a year later, officials are navigating thorny legal issues from taxes to licensure.
Wilderness vs. mining, Roundup research and Western prisons
An overall poor attitude
A Park Service team conducted an "oversight review" of Petroglyph National Monument that cited "communication and morale" as big problems for employees.
We're the good guys
In her own words, Petroglyph National Monument Supervisor Judith Cordova defends her record on the job.
Monumental chaos
New Mexico's Petroglyph National Monument is threatened by problems that include the runaway growth of the neighboring city of Albuquerque, disagreements over how to manage the resource, and a controversial, embattled superintendent, Judith Cordova.
Resort may crowd Mount Rainier
Locals and environmentalists are concerned about development plans for a 400-acre resort right next to Mount Rainier National Park and the little town of Ashford, Wash.
Dudes on the dunes
A new sport called sandboarding is becoming popular in Park Service wilderness areas with dunes, and some worry that it is a form of recreation "not compatible with wilderness values."
A gem of a park
The Conservation Fund is working with local ranchers to remove cattle from Nevada's Great Basin National Park.
A Lewis and Clark revival hits the Northwest
A revival of interest in explorers Lewis and Clark raises questions about how to handle increased tourism on the National Historic Trail through Montana - as well as questions about how the history should be told.
Continental Divide Trail
Volunteers are needed to help maintain the Continental Divide Trail from Montana to New Mexico.
Fur and loafing
In his new collection, "Fur and Loafing in Yosemite," cartoonist Phil Frank hilariously follows the adventures of dysfunctional rangers, tourists and bears in Yosemite National Park.
Tempers flare over winter plan
Bison biologist Mary Meagher joins conservationists, area business people and snowmobilers in denouncing Yellowstone National Park's new winter use plan.
Grand Canyon development sparks debate
Canyon Forest Village, a development near the south entrance of the Grand Canyon, has been approved, but some environmentalists plan to appeal the project.
Horses shy from competition
Horses and riders are being crowded off Western trails by mountain bikers and ORVers, and some have formed the Back Country Horsemen group to fight back.
Second tram heads for Moab
Some Moab, Utah, residents are up in arms about a developer's plans for a new tourist tram with a visitor center, store, restaurant and huge viewing deck at the top of the ride.
Protests proceed at Vail
Nine protesters are arrested for trying to block an access road in the White River National Forest in an attempt to halt the controversial expansion of the Vail Ski Area.
DDT doesn't just fade away
Almost 50 years after biologists dumped DDT on Yellowstone Park to kill the spruce budworm moth, traces of the pesticide remain in the ecosystem.
Politicians talk tough
Colorado's congressional delegation calls for a get-tough policy toward real estate developer Tom Chapman after a billboard advertising lots for sale appears on the boundary of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument.
Tom Chapman: A small-town boy who made good
Modern-day "robber barons" such as Tom Chapman will continue to blackmail taxpayers by threatening to develop wilderness and park inholdings - unless land-management agencies summon the will to fight back.
Give me a home where the engines roar
Race-car driver Travis Panko's plan to build a race track on a ranch near Stevensville, Mont., has many of his Bitterroot Valley neighbors incensed.
An Olympic eyesore?
In Park City, Utah, locals are irate at the ugliness of a ski jump that is being carved out of a mountain for the 2002 Winter Olympics.
Happy campers we shall always be
Although boring food, banged-up bodies and origami maps make camping a lot harder than it looks in the Dodge Dakota commercials, something like a middle-of-the-night look at the Milky Way makes all the trouble worthwhile.