Pot growers put huge energy demand on the grid
Pot growers put huge energy demand on the grid
Utilities should view legalization as an opportunity, not a threat.
What will become of the backcountry in Utah’s Wasatch?
What will become of the backcountry in Utah’s Wasatch?
In Park City, a decades-long battle against the resort industry may be all but over.
Ducks Unlimited fires writer over stream access fracas
Ducks Unlimited fires writer over stream access fracas
An axed journalist accuses a billionaire of playing fowl with sportsmen's rights.
The next great adventure: Stay home
In all the hoopla of magazines touting "adventure travel" and ecotourism, the writer wonders why folks don't consider just staying home for a change.
Telluride tackles ski town sprawl
The ski town of Telluride, Colo., is fighting a developer's plans to build up the Valley Floor, 857 acres of pasture and wetlands that are currently open space on the highway leading into town.
Volunteer Stewards
Volunteers are sought for Colorado's Natural Areas Program.
Raging river, quiet mind
"Raging River, Quiet Mind: Field Notes from the Grand Canyon" wonderfully reproduces the illustrated journal writer Teresa Jordan kept on a 12-day river trip through the Grand Canyon.
Expansion faces restrictions
Telski, the ski resort in Telluride, Colo., wins a lawsuit and can now expand onto national forest lands.
Climbing is the easy part
Climbers who wish to scale Colorado's Culebra Peak must now request permission from the new owner of the controversial Taylor Ranch, which includes the mountain.
A gutsy activist challenges a powerful industry
California homeowner Karen Schambach puts together a report documenting the abuses of off-highway vehicles and the lack of enforcement of environmental regulations.
Freedom of speech shines in Arizona cave
Matt Chew, the Arizona state parks ecologist who was fired for criticizing the development of Kartchner Caverns State Park, is reinstated by the agency.
The Great Sand Dunes: the next new national park?
A plan to expand Colorado's Great Sand Dunes National Monument and turn it into a national park would purchase the Baca Ranch and keep its much-sought-after groundwater in the San Luis Valley.
Babbitt's monument tour blazes on
The Clinton administration designates four new national monuments: Hanford Reach, Oregon's Soda Mountain area, Arizona's Ironwood Forest and the Canyons of the Ancients in southwestern Colorado.
Hikers stumble into an old dispute
A plan to extend the Continental Divide Trail through northern New Mexico's Rio Arriba County meets opposition from Hispanic locals, who claim the land under old Spanish land grants and say that until their land is returned, no trail will go through.
Take a load off
The BLM says that burros are better than llamas, goats or horses in the backcountry, and is encouraging people to adopt wild burros from Arizona and train them.
Will bears get a break?
As ATV and snowmobile use increases in the backcountry, Montana wildlife advocates are worried that the machines and the roads they make will harm grizzly bears.
Down under: Arizona boasts the 'show cave of the century'
A tour of Arizona's recently opened Kartchner Caverns State Park reveals an extraordinary underground landscape that was undiscovered until 1974.
Flashpoint in the Northern Rockies
Two backcountry huts used by cross-country skiers in Sun Valley, Idaho, were destroyed by arson, and some suspect the arsonists might have been snowmobilers irate over ORV restrictions in national forests.
Gentlemen, stop your engines!
The Park Service has begun to restrict motorized recreation in many national parks, banning tourist flights, personal watercraft and snowmobiles in some areas and working to reduce auto congestion.
Zion takes tourists out of their cars
Utah's Zion National Park, one of the nation's most popular, has become the first Western park to replace cars with a shuttle bus system in its most heavily visited area.
Preserving the westward way
The National Park Service wants to preserve the wagon ruts, campsites, graves and scenery along 13,000 miles of historic trails in the West.
Guides may get guidelines
Sen. Larry Craig's proposed Outfitters Policy Act would standardize outfitter operations on the public lands, but private users and other critics say the law would tie up the resource for commercial benefit.
Greens call snowmaking a snow job
Colorado Wild, an environmental group, is appealing the Forest Service's decision to let Arapahoe Basin Ski Area divert water from the North Fork of the Snake River for use in snowmaking.