Recreation

An expedition along the imperiled Rio Grande
An expedition along the imperiled Rio Grande
The river’s future may include longer droughts, larger floods and shrinking snowpack.
Obama declares new national monument in the mountains above Los Angeles
Obama declares new national monument in the mountains above Los Angeles
Trails, campgrounds and wildlands will qualify for federal funding for improvements.
Colorado’s river economy worth $9 billion
Colorado’s river economy worth $9 billion
Outdoor recreation businesses say state water plan must do more to protect rivers.
More ATVers than aliens
The BLM seeks to confine off-road vehicles to trails on Haystack Mountain near Roswell, N.M.
Banning the buzz
The National Park Service is developing rules to allow local park officials to restrict and possibly ban noisy personal watercraft.
Bison killing goes inside
Park officials in Yellowstone give rangers permission to shoot bison heading out of the park this winter.
Monumental conflict continues
Utah's congressional delegation continues to try to dismantle the new Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument even as the locals begin to learn to live with it.
Snowmobiles remain an issue
Snowmobilers and the tourist industry object to the Park Service's plan to close some Yellowstone trails to snowmobiling in an effort to curb the winter wandering of park bison.
Microbes for sale here
Yellowstone Park officials sign a contract that formally opens the park's hot springs to "bioprospecting," allowing the San Diego company, Diversa Corp., to collect samples of hot-water microbes called thermophiles.
Bigger might be better for Utah's parks
In Utah, Canyonlands park officials and conservationists are saying that an area slated for oil drilling, Lockhart Basin, which is right outside the park boundaries, should be included in the park and protected.
Politics tangles with science
In their own words, ecologist Charles Kay denounces Yellowstone's policy of "natural regulation," while ecologist Mark Boyce defends it.
One scientist's forbidden fruit
Scientist Richard Keigley studies Yellowstone's trees to back up his contention that the park's elk herds are out of control and need regulation.
Is nature running too wild in Yellowstone?
Maverick ecologist Richard Keigley believes Yellowstone's policy of "natural regulation" is not working and, in fact, is harming the park - especially with the park's elk herds, which he says are overgrazing their ranges.