Profiles

The Kumeyaay poet who’s disrupting nature poetry
The Kumeyaay poet who’s disrupting nature poetry
Tommy Pico merges natural and personal history of the arid West from Brooklyn, New York.
The border as a ‘weaponized’ landscape
The border as a ‘weaponized’ landscape
Border Patrol agent-turned-author Francisco Cantú examines his experiences.
A map of language charted by Navajo philosophy
A map of language charted by Navajo philosophy
Esther Belin is trying to shape a uniquely Navajo way of writing.
How to draw a duck
Biologist Betsy Whitehill is remembered for a vibrant, loving life that included teaching Alaskan schoolchildren how to draw ducks.
Don Ewy is no timber beast
Environmentalist, logger and HCN reader Don Ewy wonders who vandalized the bulldozer he used to selectively log trees in the North Fork State Forest in Colorado.
Paul Fritz left a unique legacy for the Park Service
The late Paul Fritz is remembered as a conservationist whose years in the Park Service reflect a man who was independent and outspoken.
Remembering an establishment revolutionary
Remembering the late John Sawhill, president of the Nature Conservancy, whose unique blend of environmental fervor and ability to schmooze with the rich helped to make his group the nation's largest conservation organization.
Floyd Dominy: An encounter with the West's undaunted dam-builder
An interview with legendary BuRec director Floyd Dominy reveals a man proud of the dams and water supply projects he built throughout the West - especially Glen Canyon Dam and its "most wonderful lake in the world, Lake Powell."
Farewell, Marc Reisner
With the recent untimely death of Marc Reisner, the West loses a man of independence and integrity, as well as a writer whose book "Cadillac Desert" helped to change the nation's view of Western water and water projects.
He's worried about weeds
A profile of Forest Service botanist Steve Monsen describes his battle with squarrose knapweed, which is infesting the western part of Utah, where Monsen has spent his life.
The beauty of self-reliance
Bike-shop owner Portia Masterson meets Paonia bike-cop Neal Schwieterman.
The last Celtic warlord lives in New Mexico
A profile of Catron County, N.M.'s lawyer, Jim Catron, reveals a man steeped in Celtic and cowboy mythology, and uncompromising in his anti-government fervor.
Tom Watkins has left us, but his Western dream remains
T.H. Watkins is remembered as "a writer and teacher and concerned citizen and father and husband and consummate agitator" whose literature and life revealed a deep love for the West.
Montana loses an environmental leader
Montana State Rep. Ben Cohen, environmentalist, garbageman, actor and outdoorsman, is mourned in Whitefish, Mont.
Hazel Wolf: She made it
Activist and inspiration Hazel Wolf dies at 101.
Not your average beauty queen
A profile of 24-year-old Rachel Benally shows a vibrant young woman whose family life is in bright contrast to the often-grim statistics about youth problems in the Navajo Reservation.
All you can eat at Pueblito del Paiz
In the western Colorado town of Olathe, Ted Medina's Pueblito del Paiz serves as boarding house, dining hall and occasionally tense meeting ground for the Mexican and Indian workers who labor in the area's farm fields.
A man to match our mountains
Legendary mountaineer and outdoor educator Paul Petzoldt, who founded the National Outdoor Leadership Training School (NOLS) and the Wilderness Education Association, has died at the age of 91.
Montana tribes bid their leader farewell
Michael T. "Mickey" Pablo, the recently deceased leader of Montana's seven Indian nations, is remembered as a fearless warrior in defense of his people, their land and treaty rights.
Uphill for these Idahoans
HCN readers Gene Bray and Irene Wright of Meridian, Idaho, are profiled.
Wise words from a veteran activist
A reader profile of 100-year-old Hazel Wolf, a lifelong activist and the star of the Great Old Broads for Wilderness conference.
Dick Randall, a fighter for the West
HCN honors the memory of Wyoming's Dick Randall, who went from killing coyotes for Animal Damage Control to being the strongest critic of that agency.
An 84-year-old postal veteran
As in Red Lodge, Mont., residents of Livingston also fight to keep their post office downtown, calling it the "lynchpin" of the area.