Editor's note

Seeking economic health for small towns
Seeking economic health for small towns
A project looks at how communities are faring in rural New Mexico.
Migrations, old and new
Migrations, old and new
Humans have always trekked paths to new places.
Climate change is our new reality
Climate change is our new reality
A summer of hurricanes, flooding and wildfires made it clear: the climate is changing.
What do a biker bar and nuclear waste have in common?
What do a biker bar and nuclear waste have in common?
Gritty, ongoing reportage delivers an important message: The fundamental problem with nuclear energy — its incredibly dangerous waste products — remains unsolved.
L.A. is here to stay
L.A. is here to stay
Why would any magazine editor include Los Angeles in a special issue on environmental sustainability?
Environmentalists without borders
Environmentalists without borders
The blue gum eucalyptus and its cousins are not especially invasive, making it harder to agree on their management.
For the love of trees
For the love of trees
When trees change due to the planet’s shifting climate, we change too.
Restoring the red pulse
Restoring the red pulse
Alaska’s Bristol Bay can teach us how to preserve what we still have and to restore what we’ve lost.
Western towns shaped by industries they pursue
Western towns shaped by industries they pursue
Converting an old mine to a physics lab in Lead, South Dakota, is just one example of how towns change directions due to deliberate actions as well as random chance.
A delta reborn in drought
A delta reborn in drought
Even as the Southwest teeters on the edge of a radically drier future, a rare opportunity to revive the Colorado River Delta has emerged in an agreement hashed out between Mexico, the U.S. and some of West's most powerful – and thirsty – water agencies.
Tribal casinos don’t like competition
Tribal casinos don’t like competition
The Fort Sill Apache want to build a casino in New Mexico, but established gaming tribes oppose their efforts.
Mapping our place in the West
Mapping our place in the West
This special books & essays issue considers the ways in which we use maps, literal and metaphoric, to understand a landscape.
The Green Tea Party?
The Green Tea Party?
A conservative movement embracing rooftop solar seems to be emerging.
Writing down the bones
Writing down the bones
The story behind this issue's cover feature, about a startling dinosaur discovery in Montana and ensuing scientific controversy.
The ever-shrinking West
The ever-shrinking West
Current conservation practices haven't helped the desert tortoise in the Mojave.
The politics of the possible
The politics of the possible
There are hints of progress in the long-lasting stalemate over some of Utah's -- and the world's -- most spectacular landscapes.
People are very much a part of HCN's environmental coverage
People are very much a part of HCN's environmental coverage
Latino farmworker communities in California's Central Valley suffer from polluted drinking water -- and High Country News can't ignore it.
The affordable housing quandary
The affordable housing quandary
In many Western communities, the more careful you are with land-use planning and wildlife conservation, the less you're doing for worker housing.
A spark leads to a story
A spark leads to a story
A primer on the inner workings of the electric grid.
A hard right in Idaho
A hard right in Idaho
An HCN editor reflects on the many changes around Coeur d'Alene.
Historic Northwest Forest Plan needs a careful overhaul
Historic Northwest Forest Plan needs a careful overhaul
The Northwest Forest Plan, no 20 years old, faces pressures new and old, with no easy fix in sight.
On losing nothing
On losing nothing
Climate change will transform both the Arctic and the Mojave Desert, but for different reasons
Travel, HCN-style
Travel, HCN-style
Editor’s note for HCN’s second annual special issue on travel in the West describes some quirky personal trips.